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Paul Lundgren Posts

Spalding Hotel circa 1908

This photo from Detroit Publishing Company shows Duluth’s Spalding Hotel at 428 W. Superior St. The elegant 200-room hotel opened on June 6, 1889 and was demolished on Sept. 25, 1963.

Postcards from Universal Atlas Cement Company

The postcard above was published by Arrowhead Trading Post of Duluth. It depicts part of the U.S. Steel Duluth Works campus, with Universal Atlas Cement Company in the foreground.

Duluth Book Releases in 2019

Grasshopper Girl
Written by Teresa Peterson
llustrated by Jordan Rodgers
Black Bears and Blueberries Publishing

Rez Dog
Story by Heather Brink
Illustrations by Jordan Rodgers
Black Bears and Blueberries Publishing
(March)

The Forever Sky
Thomas Peacock
Minnesota Historical Society Press
(April 1)

Dividing Duluth: The Abandoned Car Test

I’ve lived in West Duluth for the vast majority of my life. The most significant exceptions are the year I lived in the Endion neighborhood near the Duluth Armory and the three-and-a-half years I lived in the Central Hillside at Washington Studios Artist Cooperative.

Though my experiences are largely seen through western Duluth eyes, I like to think of myself as a somewhat impartial observer. I bleed the maroon and gold of a Denfeld Hunter, but I have empathy for Trojans, Cakes, Hilltoppers and those funny little home-schoolers and international magnet arsty-fartsies or whatever they are. We’re all Duluthians, Americans and humans. But we’re also part of many tribes, and our neighborhoods can define us in ways we don’t often think about.

Around the time I graduated from high school, a popular pastime among my friends was to pile into a car and simply drive around with no purpose. We were young, full of enthusiasm, and generally unfamiliar with the world outside of West Duluth. Simply driving east of Lake Avenue at that time seemed like a minor adventure, and if we were creative or lucky enough we could turn it into a significant adventure. At the time, the young women of Duluth had very different hairstyles on each side of town, so there was a visible sense of exploring a new culture in just an eight-minute drive.

The Times of Lincoln Park Junior High School 1969

As another school year ends, Perfect Duluth Day once again looks back through the pages of an old Duluth school yearbook. In this edition we present a gallery of select images from the 1969 edition of The Times, the Lincoln Park Junior High School annual.

Monthly Grovel: June 2019 Edition

(Enter the amount of your choice.)

In the past year — from June 2018 through May 2019 — the PDD Calendar published 8,016 Duluth-area events. Each one was edited by a human being before the “publish” button was pushed. We intend to keep up the good work, but (believe it or not) we could do better. There are still events we are missing. And we have a few assistants standing by who jump into action when donations roll in to pay for their future carpal tunnel surgeries.

So that’s why once a month we set our dignity aside and remind readers how much we appreciate their financial support.

How we do things at Duluth, Minn.

It’s difficult to make out the line of red text at the top of this old postcard, but it reads: “How we do things at Duluth, Minn.” Apparently “how we do things” is we doctor images to make raspberries appear to be the size of pineapples.

The undated postcard is credited to “Johnson, Photographer, Waupun, Wis.”

Postcard from First Presbyterian Church of Duluth

First Presbyterian Church established its congregation 150 years ago today — June 1, 1869. It’s magnificent sandstone structure at 300 E. Second St. was built from 1890 to 1891. The image above is from an undated postcard published by Duluth photographer Robert B. Barrett. More history of the church is online at fpcduluth.org/history.

KUMD station manager position still in limbo

Maija Jenson

When Maija Jenson transitions out of her role as interim station manager at KUMD in August it will mark the end of an era that started in 2008 when she was one of three major hires there. What the next era holds will likely be decided in the coming months.

The 62-year-old public radio station at 103.3 FM, operated by the University of Minnesota Duluth, is expected to learn soon whether the college will seek to hire a new general manager for the station. Whether it does or doesn’t, KUMD will likely continue with its usual programming, but not hiring a new GM leaves its leadership in question and might put grant funding at risk.

“We have not made any final decisions yet,” UMD Marketing and Public Relations Director Lynne Williams said in a statement today. Williams is the university’s administrator of KUMD and reports to UMD Chancellor Lendley Black.

Mystery Photo #92: Minnesota Slip Drawbridge

This old slide image shows a cabin cruiser passing under the Minnesota Slip Drawbridge, a pedestrian bridge spanning the Minnesota Slip on the Duluth waterfront. When was this photo taken?

Duluth Urban Forest Architecture

Found under construction in the Norton Park neighborhood.

Postcards from Split Rock Lighthouse

On the list of iconic structures in the Arrowhead region, the Split Rock Lighthouse is probably #2 between the Aerial Lift Bridge and Enger Tower as the most photographed. It has been featured on an endless array of postcards over the past century.

Gallery of Defunct Duluth Literary and Arts ’Zines

In addition to the various (“legitimate,” if you will) literary and arts magazines and journals in the Duluth area, past and present, there is a long tradition of renegade ’zines circulated for short periods of time. What’s technically the difference between the two? Well, a magazine or journal tends to have a glossy cover and be governed by an institution or a nonprofit board of directors. A ’zine tends to be printed on a photocopier for limited circulation and produced by an individual or disorganized group.

The Magnolias – “Playing to Win”

Twin Cities punk band the Magnolias advise hiding away in Duluth on the song “Playing to Win” from the 1992 album Off the Hook.

Feodor von Luerzer painting of Lester River

This painting of the Lester River circa 1900 was recently sold on eBay, mislabeled as a painting of “Luster River.”