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Scenic Fall Aerial Footage from Itasca County

Iron Range-based Leedrick Aerial Imaging produced this video of autumn scenery in the Holman Lake and Gibbs Park area of Itasca County near the city of Taconite, about 80 miles northwest of Duluth.

Coffee Micro-roasters in Duluth

Does anybody know of anyone roasting locally besides Duluth Coffee Company and Alakef?

Duluth Climate Mobilization Campaign Launch

Recorded Sept. 24 at Gichi-ode’ Akiing by Duluth Public Access Community Television.

Jessica Lange’s shout-out to Duluth

From Rolling Stone magazine:

What’s your favorite city and why?
Oh God, there are different ones from different times in my life. In my 20s, it was Paris — it’s 1970, I’m living by myself for the first time, everything is alive and crazy. Being that city back then … it was like another love affair! New Orleans, because it’s a separate universe down there, with different cultures co-existing in a way you don’t see other places. And Duluth, Minnesota, because it’s home. Shout-out to Duluth!

Monthly Grovel: October 2019 Edition

(Enter the amount of your choice.)

In the past year — from October 2018 through September 2019 — the PDD Calendar published 7,971 Duluth-area events. Each one was edited by a human being before the “publish” button was pushed.

It’s a tremendous amount of work to keep up with all the submissions from the more than 1,000 organizations that have sent us info about their concerts, plays, cake walks and bunco tournaments. That’s why once a month we set our dignity aside and remind readers how much we appreciate their financial support.

Duluth Stories in the Babylon Bee

An Oct. 1 headline in The Babylon Bee brings to light two things:

1) There is a satirical news website called The Babylon Bee, similar to The Onion. The differentiator being that The Babylon Bee refers to itself as “Your Trusted Source for Christian News Satire.”

2) It’s been around since 2016 and has referenced Duluth a few times, like The Onion has.

Guide to Duluth-area Podcasts in 2019

Podcasts have been a thing for about 15 years, but the medium has only been popular for maybe five years. Duluth has followed that trend, going from just one or two downloadable online audio productions in the early days to more than a two-dozen now. Some are specifically about Duluth, others feature people from the region speaking to the world about subject matter ranging from popular culture to health and wellness.

Duluth Trivia Deck Sampler #21

Another Duluth Trivia card, from a board game found at Savers, below.

PDD Quiz: Duluth in Literature

This edition of the PDD Quiz tests your knowledge of references to Duluth in literature. The 10-year-old PDD post “References to Duluth in Popular Literature” might prove useful should you want to cheat study.

The next PDD quiz will focus on September 2019 headlines; it will be published on Sept. 29. Submit question suggestions to Alison Moffat at [email protected] by Sept. 25.

I Made You Say Underwear

I still own all the underwear I’ve ever bought, probably. Like, 85 percent of it. But why? you might legitimately ask yourself. The answer is simple. Underwear is inexplicably expensive. And it takes a long time to wear out, since I don’t do very many things that would cause excessive wear-and-tear, like, say, a lot of butt-scooting on the carpet or skivvy-only horseback riding. I know I’m not alone in this, because over the years I’ve shared this fact and discovered that pretty much everyone is stockpiling ancient underwear.

As a result, I own underwear that is so old that it’s vintage — essentially archaeological artifacts. I’ve got garden-variety skivvies, of course, but I also have floppy and faded high-cut bikinis from 9th grade, lady boxers whose elastic waistbands announce their brand affiliation, and transparent lacy stretch briefs that make my ass look like a low-rent bank-robber. What I don’t have is g-strings. Not anymore.

Ahhh, the g-string. The g-string came to popularity in the late 1990s, first on strippers, then on twenty-somethings, and then, finally, on Donna, the 60-year-old cashier at ShopKo who is suprisingly racy and not interested in what you think about her undergarment selection, thank you very much and have yourself a lovely day minding your own fucking business.

My Parachute

On the day before Thanksgiving 2018, the small airplane I was piloting experienced an engine failure.

It didn’t quit, exactly, though I wish it had. Rather, the engine’s power oscillated uncontrollably every three seconds between idle and nearly full. This is not an easy way to fly an airplane.

The arc of the oscillations slowly moved to the idle side of the curve. Eventually, as the airplane and I approached Earth without the privilege of an airport below, the engine finally gave up altogether.

Fortunately for me, the airplane was equipped with a device engineered to lower the entire aircraft to the ground in an emergency, while providing a measure of survivability for the occupants: a parachute, which is deployed by the occupants via a rocket so they may live to tell their story.

After my rendezvous with the ground, I left the disabled aircraft in a frozen field, broken and askew on a large center-point irrigator, and went home and wrote down my experience. I then posted it on the internet. A few days later, Paul Lundgren, a proprietor of Perfect Duluth Day, asked if I would share my story here. I replied, “I will. But not yet. Maybe not for awhile.”

Monthly Grovel: September 2019 Edition

(Enter the amount of your choice.)

In the past year — from September 2018 through August 2019 — the PDD Calendar published 7,917 Duluth-area events. Each one was edited by a human being before the “publish” button was pushed.

It’s a tremendous amount of work to keep up with all the submissions from the more than 1,000 organizations that have sent us info about their concerts, plays, bake sales and bunco tournaments. That’s why once a month we set our dignity aside and remind readers how much we appreciate their financial support.

Mind your Business

On my way to see Burning, the Korean movie adaptation of a Haruki Murakami short story, playing at Zeitgeist Zinema in January, I heard a woman yell “Somebody help me!” from the bus stop. I couldn’t see her well; she had made herself small, the way a rabbit might make itself small for fear of a predator who has entered the garden, too.

A man was looming over her while she cowered against the wall of the Greysolon Plaza. From behind, I couldn’t see much of him, either. He wore a jacket that looked not-quite warm enough; his agitated movements were likely keeping him warm. I felt my city instincts kick in.

I’ve lived in a city all my life: Milwaukee until I was 22, St. Paul until I was 32. Duluth is the smallest community I have ever lived in, and most days, it barely feels like a city. In the quarters of a city where poor people live, anytime someone calls “help,” I think, we check it out. We need each other.

Someone called for help. I needed to check it out. I started to cross the street, putting on my most booming voice.

“What’s going on over there?”

Miss you Rick Boo.

Feel free to share your Rick stories in the comments.

Waltzes and Such: Classical and Pops Records from Gabriel’s

Some of the records left at Gabriel’s Books in Lakeside were 45s with classical music, or pops classical music, at least. It occurs to me that some readers will not know what a single is. The 45 is an interesting medium; its history is traced here.