Paul Lundgren Posts

James Moors – “Welcome to Duluth”

James Moors‘ “Welcome to Duluth” appeared on the 2008 album Hush.

Duluth You & Me: Brighton Beach Picnic

Use the link below for a printable PDF for your drawing and coloring pleasure.
Duluth You & Me: Brighton Beach Picnic

Follow the Duluth You & Me subject tag to see additional pages. For background on the book see the original post on the topic.

Duluth Ferris Wheels

COVID-19 kept the Mighty Thomas Carnival from making its annual summer appearance in Duluth. Instead, we get our Ferris wheel kicks from the photo archive.

Mystery Photo #116: Fourth of July Parade in West Duluth

The written caption tells us pretty much everything we need to know, except for one critical thing: What year was this?

The War Years: Duluth News from Above the Fold

A collection of World War II-era newspapers, saved in a bushel box by an old timer, make up the content of a Facebook page called Duluth News Tribune and Herald the War Years. Rick Hamilton has been showcasing pieces of the old newspapers there since July 2017.

In a series of four posts, Perfect Duluth Day is featuring samplings from the collection. This final gallery displays a few front page headlines.

The War Years: World War II Duluth News Clippings

A collection of World War II-era newspapers, saved in a bushel box by an old timer, make up the content of a Facebook page called Duluth News Tribune and Herald the War Years. Rick Hamilton has been showcasing pieces of the old newspapers there since July 2017.

In a series of four posts, Perfect Duluth Day is featuring samplings from the collection. This third gallery displays news clips related to the war.

The War Years: Life in Duluth

A collection of World War II-era newspapers, saved in a bushel box by an old timer, make up the content of a Facebook page called Duluth News Tribune and Herald the War Years. Rick Hamilton has been showcasing pieces of the old newspapers there since July 2017.

In a series of four posts, Perfect Duluth Day is featuring samplings from the collection. This second gallery displays general Duluth-related news stories.

The War Years: Duluth Commerce

A collection of World War II-era newspapers, saved in a bushel box by an old timer, make up the content of a Facebook page called Duluth News Tribune and Herald the War Years. Rick Hamilton has been showcasing pieces of the old newspapers there since July 2017.

In a series of four posts, Perfect Duluth Day is featuring samplings from the collection. This first gallery displays advertising clips.

Hayes Block Downtown Duluth Post Office

From 1870 to 1894, Duluth’s downtown post office was located in the Hayes Block, a building that still stands at 26 E. Superior St. as part of the Wieland Block apartments.

Happy 17th birthday to us

There are free birthday cupcakes at Wussow’s drive-through from 5:10 to 6:30 p.m. (or until they are gone) tonight, June 29, in celebration of Perfect Duluth Day’s anniversary!

Duluth You & Me: Summertime Racers

Use the link below for a printable PDF for your drawing and coloring pleasure.
Duluth You & Me: Summer Time Racers

Follow the Duluth You & Me subject tag to see additional pages. For background on the book see the original post on the topic.

Postcard from Franklin School in 1910

This postcard was mailed 110 years ago today — June 27, 1910. It shows Franklin Elementary School at 411 E. Seventh St., and the surrounding neighborhood. Franklin School was demolished in 1979 and is today the site of Hillside Sport Court Park. More on the history of Franklin School can be found on zenithcity.com.

Postcard from George A. Gray Company of Duluth

The George A. Gray Company was located at 117 W. Superior St. The building became a Wahl’s department store in 1936 and is still standing today, though it looks quite different.

Duluth You & Me: The Depot

Use the link below for a printable PDF for your drawing and coloring pleasure.
Duluth You & Me: The Depot

Follow the Duluth You & Me subject tag to see additional pages. For background on the book see the original post on the topic.

Mystery Photos #112-115: Wide Awake Studios

The same pair of gentlemen appear in the photos above from the Wide Awake Studio in Duluth. In addition to the mystery of who the subjects of these photos might be is the question of why the particular studio they are standing in was open seven days a week until midnight. Why would people at the turn of the 20th Century want to, for example, get their photos taken at 11 p.m. on a Sunday? Was that normal?