Paul Lundgren Posts

First Presbyterian Church of Duluth circa 1870

Duluth’s First Presbyterian Church was built at 231 E. Second St. in 1870. It was replaced by a larger building in 1891, across the street at 300 E. Second St., which still stands. The original church was used by other congregations until it was demolished in 1971. The area is now a parking lot for Rainbow Senior Center.

Breaking Ice to Bring in Freighters on the 20th of January

This postcard, published by the Hugh C. Leighton Company, was never mailed and has no year marked on it, but the caption on the front would indicate the illustration is based on a photo shot on Jan. 20 of some year in the early 1900s.

Whether the artist drew people standing on the edge of the ice as a creative choice or whether they were really standing there is not known, unless the photo exists somewhere. Either way, file the act of walking out to ice breakers in the “no, don’t do that” category.

Matchbooks from Duluth Restaurants and Bars

It’s been five years since Perfect Duluth Day published its first gallery of Duluth-area matchbooks. Since then, the collection has grown significantly. This new post features only matchbooks from bars and restaurants in Duluth. Some of them have been pulled out of the original post and placed in this new post; others are appearing for the first time.

Enjoy the nostalgia and, whatever you do, for the love of humanity, please close cover before striking.

Haroula Rose – “Duluth”

Ten years ago today — Jan. 18, 2011 — Los Angeles-based musician Haroula Rose released her debut album These Open Roads, which includes a cover of the Mason Jennings song “Duluth.”

Duluth You & Me: Grand Finale

We have reached the end of the Duluth You & Me series. Use this link for a printable PDF to color the final page: Duluth You & Me: Do come back again!

Or, download a PDF of the whole book: Duluth You & Me full PDF

Follow the Duluth You & Me subject tag to see all the pages as individual posts on Perfect Duluth Day. For background on the book see the original post on the topic.

Clark House Hotel, West Superior Street circa 1870

This uncredited photo, presumably shot by Paul B. Gaylord, shows the 100 block of West Superior Street in Downtown Duluth looking northeast. The Clark House Hotel, in the foreground at left, was Duluth’s second hotel, opening in July 1870.

Postcard from London Manor Motel

This undated postcard, published by Gallagher’s Studio of Photography, shows the London Manor Motel, one of several lodging businesses that comprised London Road’s old “Motel Row.” London Manor later became the Chalet Motel, which was torn down in 2011. A Sherwin-Williams paint store was built at the location in 2019.

Duluth You & Me: A Review Game

As the Duluth You & Me series nears its conclusion, we present this review game. Use the link below for a printable PDF to use as your game board.
Duluth You & Me: A Review Game

Follow the Duluth You & Me subject tag to see additional pages. For background on the book see the original post on the topic.

Making a Statement

Everyone is expected to make a statement from time to time. The obvious high-level example is when there’s a natural disaster or some kind of manmade violence and we await official remarks from the President of the United States. But it extends all the way to the dinner table, where someone might ask, “Beatrice, what do you think about copper-nickel sulfide mining?”

Some would say it’s rude to bring something like that up over supper. Beatrice might choke on the green-bean casserole in panic, fearing a faction of the family could cut ties with her if she speaks her mind.

In America we like to profess that Beatrice is just as important as Donald Trump or Joe Biden, but we are also quick to acknowledge that opinions are amplified by status and reputation.

Donald Trump has a posse. Joe Biden has a posse. It doesn’t matter if Beatrice is more intelligent, more articulate or could kickbox both of their teeth in. She is just Beatrice. They are Presidents.

Monthly Grovel: January 2021

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As the masked, online and distanced events drags on, the PDD Calendar continues to catalog the options. Each month we reach out with one beggarly blog post to remind everyone that human beings and not machines are at work editing and publishing calendar events. So if you appreciate it, drop a few bucks in the PayPal account.

Postcard from Duluth’s Hotel Lenox

This undated postcard, published by E. C. Kropp Co. of Milwaukee, highlights some of the features of the Hotel Lenox in Downtown Duluth. The hotel was torn down in the 1960s.

Duluth You & Me: Draw What You Like

We’re nearing the end of the Duluth You & Me series and this one from the back of the book is a real do-it-yourselfer.

Use the link below for a printable PDF for your coloring and drawing pleasure.
Duluth You & Me: DIY

Follow the Duluth You & Me subject tag to see additional pages. For background on the book see the original post on the topic.

Mystery Photo #129: Trolley Car and Conductors

This undated postcard photo of two conductors standing next to a trolley car comes with a few details. The trolley car has a destination sign that reads: “W. Dul. & Aerial Bridge.” And the word “Duluth” is handwritten on the back of the card.

Happy New Year from Duluth Lumberjacks

2020: The Year in Duluth Gig Posters

Obviously this past year has been about the lousiest live-music year ever, but nonetheless we continue our tradition at Perfect Duluth Day of looking back at a sampling of gig posters. Some shows really happened, with crowds of people, before the pandemic. Others were cancelled. Others were held outside in spaces that allowed physical distancing. And some were streamed online.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!