Quantcast

Postcards Posts

How we do things at Duluth, Minn.

It’s difficult to make out the line of red text at the top of this old postcard, but it reads: “How we do things at Duluth, Minn.” Apparently “how we do things” is we doctor images to make raspberries appear to be the size of pineapples.

The undated postcard is credited to “Johnson, Photographer, Waupun, Wis.”

Postcard from First Presbyterian Church of Duluth

First Presbyterian Church established its congregation 150 years ago today — June 1, 1869. It’s magnificent sandstone structure at 300 E. Second St. was built from 1890 to 1891. The image above is from an undated postcard published by Duluth photographer Robert B. Barrett. More history of the church is online at fpcduluth.org/history.

Postcards from Split Rock Lighthouse

On the list of iconic structures in the Arrowhead region, the Split Rock Lighthouse is probably #2 between the Aerial Lift Bridge and Enger Tower as the most photographed. It has been featured on an endless array of postcards over the past century.

Postcard from Thompson Hill Information Center and Rest Area

This undated postcard has the following text on the back:

The Thompson Hill Information Center and Rest Area is located at the junction of I-35 and US 2 on a 28 acre site overlooking the St. Louis River Valley and the Duluth-Superior metropolitan area. The Information Center is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with tourist and travel information and road condition reports available during the day as a service of the Minnesota Highway Department.

A Nice Catch of Trout from Northern Minnesota

The text on the back of this undated postcard from Gallagher’s Studio of Photography reads simply: “A nice catch of trout from northern Minnesota.”

The 2019 lake and stream trout seasons open on May 11.

Frisco or Dust Shields?

What that scribbled message on the front of this postcard is all about will have to be left to speculation in the comments. The card was mailed 110 years ago — May 4, 1909.

Postcard from Thomson Dam Hydro Station

This card is postmarked May 3, 1909 — 110 years ago today. Edis Johnson sent it from Duluth to Mr. H.T. West of Toronto, Canada.

Postcards from Duluth Motel

According to this postcard, Duluth Motel sat in some mysterious forest, perhaps offering the only toilet available for miles and miles. In reality, “Northwest’s Most Luxurious Motel” was near Denfeld High School and surrounded by West Duluth homes and businesses. A lush, undeveloped hillside was indeed in the distance, though not very similar looking to the illustration on the postcard.

Don’t Tell Mom

Frank Hoolihan sent this postcard to Mrs. Galivan in Buffalo, NY imploring her to tell Sarah not to let anyone know that he’s in Duluth. He doesn’t want his mom to find out. I suspect he sailed up the Great Lakes to Duluth to get away for some reason. Or maybe he was just on a lark. It does raise a few questions. I can’t make out the year in the postmark but I’m guessing around 1909 or so.

Postcard from a Lumber Raft in Duluth

Postcard from Duluth’s Edgewater Motel

This undated postcard from Gallagher’s Studio of Photography depicts Duluth’s Edgewater Motel, probably circa the 1960s. Today it is known as the Edgewater Hotel & Waterpark, located at 2400 London Road.

Postcard from Duluth Fire Department Engine House #1

This undated postcard shows Duluth Fire Department Engine House #1 at 101 E. Third St., one of the first fire houses in the city of Duluth. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1975.

View from Top of Famous Incline Railway, Duluth, Minn.

This undated postcard, published by Gopher News Co. of Minneapolis, has the following text on the backside:

A novel attraction is the incline railway at 7th Ave. West and Superior Street. These cable cars connect the downtown section with Duluth Heights. In eight city blocks rise to an elevation 500 feet above lake level from where unusual views of Duluth, Lake Superior, Minnesota Point, and the Duluth Superior Harbor are obtainable.

The incline operated until 1939. More info and similar images can be found on the PDD post “Postcards from Duluth’s Incline Railway.”

Bargaining for love in Duluth

This undated postcard, published by Bamforth & Co., promises requited love in the flower patches of Duluth. Happy Valentine’s Day.

Postcards from Neptune

This statue of Neptune stood on the edge of Duluth’s shipping canal from 1959 to 1963. The text on the back of the postcard reads:

Neptune — Symbolic Ruler of the Sea
This statue was given Duluth by the State Fair Board and the land loaned by the Corps of Engineers at Canal Park, Duluth, Minn. to commemorate the arrival of the first deep draft ocean going vessel in to Duluth on May 3, 1959. Neptune was God of the Sea — son of Cronus and Rhea. The Greeks called him Poseidon. He was Jupiter’s brother. Neptune controlled all the waters of the earth and was worshiped by sailors. The 3 prong spear he carried was called Trident.