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David Beard Posts

Ken Bloom’s Retirement Party

Last night, I visited the Tweed Museum for the Ken Bloom retirement party. Normally, the retirement of a colleague at the university would not be something to draw attention to — but Ken Bloom is different, and I’d guess two hundred people were at the Tweed to share in the event.

Duluth Trivia Deck Sampler #14

More from the deck found at Savers …

1. Who sculpted the statue of Daniel Greysolon Sieur du Lhut at UMD?
2. Where was that statue cast?
3. When did UMD become a campus of the UM system?
4. Who was the first provost of UMD?
5. Which US President visited UMD in 1963?
6. Which UMD graduate was “Carlton the Doorman” on TV’s “Rhoda”?

Duluth Trivia Deck Sampler #13

More from the deck found at Savers …

1. In 1871, who ridiculed the City of Duluth in the House of Representatives, helping to defeat a land grant bill?
2. What was “The Clark House”?
3. Who was J. B. Culver?
4. When was the Grand Opera House destroyed by fire?
5. Who was Oliver G. Traphagen?
6. In 1891, what downtown Duluth building was called “the handsomest and costliest building in the Northwest?

Duluth Trivia Deck Sampler #12

A few years ago, I bought a Duluth Trivia game at Savers. Here are some more questions.

1. Where is the Chambers Grove picnic area?
2. What is the name of the annual dog sled race that begins in Duluth?
3. What is the name of the longest fresh-water sandspit in the world?
4. How many stars are in the cluster of stars in the official seal of the city of Duluth? What do they represent?
5. Who was William T Boutwell?
6. When was Fond du Lac annexed by the city of Duluth?

Shark Watching Society

I spent part of Wednesday in front of a bonfire setting marshmallows on fire. There is really no point to slowly toasting them when you can set them on fire, after all. It was a meeting of the Lake Superior Shark Watching Society.

Art in an Unusual Place

Photo of Artist by Carrie Boberg

I went to see the exhibit by Rob Adams, as discussed on Radio Gallery. It’s being shown within the workspace of a professional design company in Downtown Duluth.

Pictures of Spring

Naomi’s photography blog is great at sharing images of Duluth. Yesterday she shared this beautiful image of the return of Spring.

Ken Bloom’s Tweevening

Ken Bloom packed the Tweed for a “Tweevening.”  Ken is a photographer who directs and occasionally curates shows, and as he retires, the Tweed is celebrating his medium.

Where in Duluth?: First Trailwalk of the Season

Is this too easy? I only get here a few times a year, so it seems alien landscape to me.

Can you tell I have a new phone?

May the Fourth (Doctor) be with You on Free Comic Book Day

May Fourth was a great day for nerds around the Duluth area. Claimed by Star Wars fans with the slightest bit of imagination, only the slightest, the Fourth of May is Star Wars Day. I cringe, still, every time I hear someone say “May the Fourth be with You.” Except when William Shatner says it, because the irony I read into it is delicious.

Francis Chapin at the Art Institute of Chicago

Railroad Yard, Duluth, 1918–1965

There are a few works by Francis Chapin at the Art Institute of Chicago. More info about Chapin can be found on Wikipedia.

Coal Depot, Duluth Harbor

Coal Depot, Duluth Harbor, Stuart David Klipper

The Art Institute of Chicago has many cool works of art with a Duluth connection available online.

Eric T. Anderson of Duluth

This photo of Eric T. Anderson, age 56 circa 1963, born in Duluth, is part of the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago. It was taken by Danny Lyon.

I don’t know the story or the man. Do you?

From Jinny Moe’s photography collection

Virginia “Jinny” Moe of Duluth donated this work to the the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Boy and Girl Holding Hands, ca. 1850, by Bennet.

Worden Day in Metropolitan Museum, via Julie Nunull Marshall

Another item at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is this item donated by Julie Nunull Marshall of Duluth. (I can’t find any records about her easily, beyond the record of generosity and taste.)

In the 1970s she donated Arcana II, 1969, by Worden Day to the Metropolitan.

Worden Day is now deceased, but immortalized by the generosity of a Duluthian.