January 2020 Posts

The Goldfines Go East

In the year 2000, Duluth businessman Monnie Goldfine recorded a voiceover track for his family films, most of which he shot himself between 1939 and 1946. Perfect Duluth Day has divided the footage into three segments:

Selective Focus: Elizabeth Pawlik

Liz Pawlik is a self-taught metalsmith, making jewelry under the name “Fond of That.” She describes herself as a “curious, full-fledged dabbler” also exploring photography. Her love of photography shows in the product photos for Fond of That. The pieces thoughtfully displayed, and the textures, scale and unique qualities of each material are beautifully highlighted.

EP: I’m the metalsmith and jewelry designer behind Fond of That. Mere curiosity and the desire to create made me start my self-taught exploration of metalsmithing. I’m drawn to the challenge of turning raw materials into wearable art through the movement of my hands, fire and strength. I will not stop learning, experimenting and adding to my literal and figurative toolbox. You’ll find common shapes in my work, as well as texture, asymmetry and organic flair sprinkled throughout. Mobiles have recently been added to my collection after I created one for my son’s nursery.

Climate>Duluth: Jenna Yeakle

Host Tone Lanzillo interviews Jenna Yeakle, organizing representative of the local Sierra Club. This is show #7 in the series Climate>Duluth series recorded at Duluth Public Access Community Television’s studio in City Hall.

LowH1Funk – “Looking for Love”

In the ongoing effort to chronicle songs that call out “Duluth,” here’s a recent one by local hip-hop act LowH1Funk from the three-track EP Ghostly. “Duluth” is referenced at the 36-second mark.

Duluth Trivia Deck Sampler #38

Another trivia card from a board game purchased at Savers.

WDSE-TV launching fifth channel, PBS Kids

WDSE-TV will begin broadcasting the PBS Kids channel on Friday, Jan. 31. It will occupy channel 8.5 in Duluth; WIRT viewers in the Hibbing area will find it on channel 31.5.

The network features educational programming all day, and is available for live streaming at pbskids.org. Some notable programs include Arthur, Sesame Street and Wild Kratts.

It’s WDSE’s fifth channel, joining PBS North (8.1), Create (8.2), Explore (8.3) and MN Channel (8.4).

The primary PBS channel, PBS North, will continue to feature a PBS Kids daypart during the week and on weekend mornings. The schedule of children’s programming on PBS North will be different from PBS Kids.

Former Franklin Foods facility in Lincoln Park sold, eyed for possible hotel or apartment development

Property on the 1900 block of West First Street that once served as a milk processing facility could soon be redeveloped. It shares an alley with popular new enterprises in the Lincoln Park Craft District such as Flora North, Hemlock Leatherworks, Duluth Folk School, OMC Smokehouse, the Noble Pour and Duluth Tap Exchange.

A national hotel and apartment builder has purchased a large, blighted property inside the trendy, fast-growing Lincoln Park Craft District.

Northridge Accommodations LLC purchased the former Kemps dairy at 1928 W. First St. on Dec. 30. According to Minnesota Department of Revenue records, Franklin Foods sold the property — advertised as the largest contiguous site available in Lincoln Park — for $450,000.

The Playlist Presents: Superior Siren

WDSE-TV‘s The PlayList Presents is a series of 5-minute segments featuring emerging musicians, including interview clips and a live performance. The Jan. 23 episode focused on Laura Sellner of the eerie folk band Superior Siren, with footage from the 2019 Catalyst Content Festival.

Superior Siren performs at Sacred Heart Music Center on Valentine’s Day with Tender Ness.

The PlayList Presents airs Thursday nights at around 8:20 p.m., after Making it Up North.

PDD Quiz: January 2020 in Review

Test your knowledge of local headlines and happenings with this week’s PDD current events quiz!

The theme of the next quiz will test your knowledge of notable Twin Ports bathrooms (really!); it will be published on Feb. 9. Submit question suggestions to Alison Moffat at [email protected] by Feb. 5.

Mud

The mud in Southeast Alaska is everywhere. From Vancouver to Skagway a lush, near-ostentatiously green forest covers every conceivable surface with a teeming, tumbling, vulgarity of foliage. The Tongass National Forest is like a skunky Eden, ancient pine and spruce trees standing clustered tight as hair on a head, their verdance made that much more outstanding by the complement of thick, gray sky. It’s a North American rainforest. It rains 300 days a year, in one fashion or another, in my hometown. If the Inuit people have more than 200 words for the various elegant permutations of snow, the fishermen in Southeast Alaska have half again as many swear words for rain.

There is the putative rain that everyone knows, a tumbling shower from amassed clouds, a mixed blessing of ruined hairstyles and refreshed lawns. Then, there is the torrential downpour, bending fat blossoms under the combined weight of nectar and water, cracking peony stems and laying ferns flat against the ground like splayed bodies clinging to the surface of the earth. Drizzle — the most onomatopoeic word for a weather phenomenon, that half-hearted report from the heaven that everything, everywhere is gray and dull — is the meteorological equivalent of “meh,” spelled in water. But there is another type of rain, a sort of surreptitious precipitation that starts as gentle and refreshing as the misty spray from a waterfall, tiny cool droplets tickling the skin and seemingly innocuously disappearing. But there, along your eyebrows, a heavy bead of water leans ominously toward your eye, the ponderous descent changing its trajectory to head it straight along your nasal fold into your mouth. And there, along your temple, droplets as sure and regular as cold, portly beads of sweat begin to accumulate and race down your face into the neckline of your inadequate sweater. And your sweater! Wool and practical, has suddenly gone from misted with tiny, fruit-fly-sized droplets to saturated, impregnated on the very molecular level with water. Water fills your boots this way. Water drips from your nose like a dysfunctional faucet. Water drips between your teenaged breasts and makes the underwire of your bra cold and wretched. By the time you get to school, just a 30-minute walk — you are as wet as a newborn calf, and every bit as disoriented and gangly.

Selective Focus: Yarrow Mead – Silversmith, process video

Yarrow Mead and her jewelry work were featured on Perfect Duluth about one year ago. This video by Keegan Burckhard shows what goes into her process of working with silver.
 
Links:
Selective Focus: Yarrow Mead
Yarrow Mead Metals
Keegan Burckhard

Video Flashback: Snocross 2019

The 2019 Duluth Snocross will be most remembered for the Thanksgiving Weekend Snowout, which led to the cancellation of the second and third days of the snowmobile racing event. But the there was one day of action, captured above in a short documentary by Adam Jagunich, and below in the official Snocross recap video.

Dave Mehling – “What About Tonight?”

Duluth native Dave Mehling has released the second video featuring music from his upcoming album — Beach Boy.

Mehling performs at Blush in Duluth on Jan. 31 with the Key Kids and Mint Vintage.

Duluth Trivia Deck Sampler #37: Outdoor Sports Edition

Another trivia card from a board game purchased at Savers.

Grandma’s Marathon 2019 Double: 52.4-mile Bachelor Party

“Marathons are hard. Double marathons are harder.”

A perennial favorite on Perfect Duluth Day is Eric Strand’s annual video of his jaunt from the finish line to the starting line and back to the finish line of Grandma’s Marathon. Yes, that’s right, he runs the course twice. Every year. The 2019 installment is the eighth-annual Grandma’s Marathon Double, and includes, among others, an about-to-be-married dude named Zach embarking on the 52.4-mile run.