Duke of Duluth?

Superior isn’t the only city that enjoys its suds. This photo was bought at an auction several years ago. On the frame, it is titled “Duke of Duluth.” I know it is not the Duke of Duluth I am thinking of. Notice the great detail of flies on the beer mug. Does anyone one have a clue as to who this guy was? The framed photo served as a traveling photo for a long list of jolly fellows. The name written on the cardboard backing is Gust. Munding, Rush City Minnesota. Was this part of a beer campaign?

10 Comments

Bret

about 11 years ago

I found a Gustav Munding who was born in Toledo in 1859 and ran a saloon there in a 1890s.  Wonder if he made his way to Rush City and Duluth?

Darcy

about 11 years ago

Gustaf Munding, his wife Anna and daughters Emilie (age 7), Anna (age 5) and Franciska (age 2) arrived in NY from Germany on Oct 16, 1880 on a ship named Oder. The family is listed on the Minnesota territorial and U.S. censuses in Rush City in 1885 - 1910, where Gustaf worked as a blacksmith. The 1920 census shows his wife Anna, a widow, living with their youngest daughter's family.

Michelle

about 11 years ago

Thanks so much for the research. I knew PDD would come through. I will go to ancestry dot com to see if there are any family members out there who would like to get a copy of this photo.

Patricia

about 11 years ago

What a great picture.

MasterBlaster

about 11 years ago

What I wouldn't do for a frothy brew circa 1890 right now.....

Cory Fechner

about 11 years ago

Great photo!  It is amazing he was able to hold that pose for a photo taken so long ago.  The exposure time on cameras back then were pretty long and the subjects where told not to move for as long as 30 seconds depending on the light.  That is why many times people are not smiling in old photos.  It is harder to hold a smile as well as not blink for longer periods of time.

Paul Lundgren

about 11 years ago

As of about five years ago there was a big, framed copy of this photo behind the bar, above the cash register, at the Northeastern Saloon & Grille on Dunlap Island in Cloquet. It had the caption "Happy Days" on it, referring to the end of Prohibition.

I don't get to Cloquet very often, so I have no idea if the picture is still there.

The Friendly Old Knifey

about 11 years ago

It is. It's still there.

Michelle

about 11 years ago

I will go see it myself! Thanks. Maybe it will shed some light on my photo.

Matt_O

about 11 years ago

Do you figure anything else out about this photo.  I can do a little research too, I've got an ancestry.com subscription too.

Leave a Comment

Only registered members can post a comment , Login / Register Here

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!
Read previous post:
Superior reeks with booze and filth

This headline and illustration are from the August 18, 1917 issue of the Duluth Rip Saw. The story is without...

Close