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A Little Kozy History

An earlier post about a car hitting the Kozy brought a discussion of the building, so I thought I’d share what I know of the building. So here’s some info on the Kozy we at X-Comm have gathered for a forthcoming book, Duluth’s Grand Old Buildings.

Pastoret Flats was designed by Duluth and Honolulu architect Oliver Traphagen and commissioned by Michael Pastoret in 1887. The Romanesque Revival building, faced in brick and brownstone, included a corner tower which with a witch’s hat roof, which was removed about 1924. The architecturally incongruent addition on first floor was added in 1924.

Originally the building held six townhouses which were advertised in 1887 as “costly residences,” each of two stories with front porches, arched windows, some with balconies and wrought iron railings on the roof line.  Sometime, probably in the 1920s, the townhouses were remodeled into small apartments. Also in the 1920s a restaurant opened on the corner and after Prohibition that business became the Kozy Bar.

Along with his partner Oliver Stenson, Pastoret, described as “a capitalist” in 1888, also built the Pastoret-Stenson Block (aka Lowell Block), another Richardsonian Romanesque Traphagen-designed building at 29-33 East Superior Street in 1888 using brownstone quarried at Ingall’s Quarry in Fond du Lac. Originally six stories high and decorated with and stone carvings, the top three floors were removed after a fire in 1930 (four died in the fire) that was rumored to have been started by the explosion of a still (Prohibition era).

The building was first used to house Pastoret and Stenson’s dry goods store (Pastoret later switched to real estate; his brother was a noted contractor), then rented to an undertaker, Singer sewing machines, Gotkins Greater Markets, B & Y Cap Company (the fire took place under their watch), King Korn Stamps, the Duluth Sewing Center, and even a Radio Shack. Last residents: John’s Used Furniture and the Last Place on Earth. The building was demolished by A&L Development to build the Technology Village.

12 Comments

mevdev

about 9 years ago

Thanks Tony, that was great!

mevdev

about 9 years ago

Also that first floor addition is horrendous. What an eyesore.

Bret

about 9 years ago

It's a great building just waiting to be restored.

Carla

about 9 years ago

http://www.ericringsred.com/kozy_bar_1.htm

Tony D.

about 9 years ago

Update: Became the Kozy after 1960; still tracking down previous tavern's name.

Tony D.

about 9 years ago

Almost forgot: many thanks to Maryanne Norton for the bulk of the info I posted above!

Bruce

about 9 years ago

It's a great building just waiting to be restored.

Patricia

about 9 years ago

Thank you that was so interesting.  What a grand, beautiful place it was. It is hard to even picture that it is the same place.  I wish I could write a book on the people that go there and sit and drink. As a little girl my father brought me there. I remember dancing and singing for chips and a pop. I was maybe 3-4 years old. I know nowadays it sounds terrible, but I loved it and yes my dad drove home drunk -- thank god with no accidents -- but back in 1969 or so it wasn't an issue.  My dad passed away and I get to go down there from time to time and talk to people that were drinking with my father back then. They are still there. They tell me stories about him and in a very strange way it makes me feel like I am finding a bit of my dad's spirit there.

Jamie

about 9 years ago

Wow. Good story, Patricia!

PJ

about 9 years ago

It's a gorgeous building and I'd love to see someone buy it and restore it. And Patricia: great story.

Claire

about 9 years ago

Tony and Patricia, thanks to both of you, for the history and for the personal reminiscences. Patricia, I'm sorry for the loss of the building, it's obvious how important it was to you, b/c of the memories associated with it. Thanks for sharing your story, and if you can think of any others...

Claire

about 9 years ago

Tony! Book idea: oral histories of the Kozy by people like Patricia... or maybe include oral histories in your "Lost Duluth" landmark book? I thought Patricia's memories were compelling, it'd be cool to hear more stories like hers about lost landmarks.

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