Opinions on winter clothing

Thought I’d check here to see if anyone has any suggestions.

I’m looking to replace my ‘ol generic JCP winter coat with a “high quality” brand.  Had been looking at Canada Goose but I’d like to stay away from down filled coats because of the cleaning issue.  Anyone got anything they’ve found that really does the job with warmth along with a water repellant and/or water proof exterior?  I realize warmth is relative but shoot some suggestions.  Thanks.

27 Comments

baci

about 10 years ago

layer layer layer shell!

ginger

about 10 years ago

What's the "cleaning issue" with down? They're machine washable/dryable.

Jeff

about 10 years ago

http://www.nikwax.com/en-us/products/productdetail.php?productid=269&activityid=-1&itemid=-1&fabricid=-1

zra

about 10 years ago

what baci said.

quality is expensive, but when you're playing around in the frigid air, you'll know where that money went.

lojasmo

about 10 years ago

http://www.rei.com/outlet/product/790162

This.  $119 @ rei-outlet.com

I got one for my son.  10,000/10,000 breathable and waterproof, with a million pockets, removable hood, snowskirt, and pit-zips.  DO IT!

Nick

about 10 years ago

A good wool coat will last a lifetime and the style is timeless. They are also very warm and comfortable.

http://www.bemidjiwoolenmills.com/details.php?id=bm07_123

cork1

about 10 years ago

Check out Sierra Trading Post -- I've gotten some nice winter clothing on the cheap there. Close-out (a/k/a last year's models) stuff is cheaper but not necessarily any different. As mentioned, layering is key -- 3-in-1 stuff will have a shell and removable fleece liner.

Beverly

about 10 years ago

I don't think it's waterproof, but I love my Carhart jacket. I layer it over a fleece jacket. It is, perhaps, better suited for farmers and lumberjacks and not well suited for going out to a bar, but I still love it.

jeffp_032056

about 10 years ago

Ginger, as far as the cleaning issue, the higher quality down coats require dry cleaning only, they are not machine washable.

zra

about 10 years ago

over: silk or polyester base layer>poly/cotton blend tee>heavier weight polyester overlayer> gore windstopper vest (mountain hardware)>gore tex softshell (again, mountain hardware).

under: silk, midweight or windfront heavyweight base layer>insulated pants (prana, or my custom made pair)>shell pants (marmot membrain or *again* custom made shell)

de feet: smartwool or teko socks under steger arctic mukluks.

a good pair of mitts/gloves is really hard to find. i have a couple of options, but i'm still looking.

headwear is important as well, and i typically use some sort of neck gaiter in addition to my standard black watchcap.



i am fortunate to know a couple of ladies who're handy with a sewing machine and can fabricate as per my *requirements.* if i can't find what i'm looking for on the rack (i'm picky), i just have it made. might take a while, but i get what i want.

digit3

about 10 years ago

Not sure what defines "higher quality" in down jackets such that they require dry cleaning. Lower quality jackets like Patagucci, Marmot, Arcteryx, etc (you know, the $400 ones) can all be washed and dried in the machines at home.

MJ

about 10 years ago

A semi-related question: The liner on my trusty wool coat is worn and torn.  Where is the best place in town to get a new liner sewn in?

carla

about 10 years ago

I have an Anne Klein full length coat down that I bought on sale at Norstrom's.  I take it to the cleaners one a year or every other year depending on the winter.  It is now five years old and doing fine.
I LOVE not having to layer - to just be able to put on my coat and be warm enough and not be too hot inside.

jeffp_032056

about 10 years ago

Maybe I'm not looking at the "right" down coats.  The few I've looked at all say Dry Clean Only.  Also, I'm trying to get away from layering.

lojasmo

about 10 years ago

Jeff

Look at my above post....really.

wildgoose

about 10 years ago

Since no one has mentioned leather, I will.  I have a leather coat from about ten years ago that is very warm.  the liner was in tatters and I brought it in to Leone's seamstress on 2nd E and 1st St and they took awhile but they got me a super warm custom liner.  Now I just have to get it back.  the buttons keep coming off of it, I'm rough on things I guess.  But one thing i like about it is what Carla says, you throw it on and you are good for most day to day outdoor stuff. Never tried it camping or hiking, and definitely not the right attitude for skiing and such ... but its great for day to day.  

My back up is an about 15 year old columbia jacket (forget which style). It's a workhorse, gets the job done, and I rarely need layers unless camping or something.

Jude

about 10 years ago

It is tough to find the right jacket.  This year I looked everywhere, I mean everywhere, Goodwill and SA included, for the right combination of style and warmth.  I found the $400 ones (at local ski/outdoor places) were frequently sized for teens and not for tall women with long arms who run a snowblower (and need a hood).  How can there be so much price difference between jackets I wondered? I was prepared for top dollar and goose down but they must all be made on a prototype from Korea, not for northwoods women. 

North Face be shamed, I am so sick of seeing your name in front of me in check-out lines.... Sheesh~~~your XL women's sleeves leave 5" of skin explosed!! And for $350. Forget it. 

Well, after weeks of looking, I found a jacket for $49~~~ NOT on sale,  that is amazingly warm, has a hood, is reversible with fuzzy stuff on one side, and gets compliments besides!!  And at the risk of being banished from this blog I found it at Gander Mountain, right beside the $300+ Columbia ones.  I estimate I had to use about 14 hours of shopping time to find something that fit and looked my age and gender (not a teenager, not a logger).   

And in this last storm it was warmer than goose down when wearing it in the 40 mph wind while snowblowing, and it repelled all the rain besides. A fabulous jacket all around. (No, I have no link to GM, do not even know anyone there, and only went there as a last resort).  Just saying you gotta persevere.  And women need a new look, not just a new lining....lol.

Boedette

about 10 years ago

Lands End insulated squall jacket. I've had mine for 4 years now and it's the warmest parka I've ever had. It still looks very good after several washes. It comes with a nice insulate hood that comes off, and lots of pockets. I wore it outside late last night at a bonfire for about 2 hours and never got a bit cold. I got mine at the end of the season for $80, and I love mine so much that bought one for the hubby this Xmas. He's very happy with it. Nice thing about Lands End is that if you don't like it you can take it back to Sears at the Mall. In fact they probably have them at Sears in the Lands End section.

Ruthie

about 10 years ago

I have two jackets I wear during the winter.  First is my windblock, fleece Wintergreen 3/4 length coat.  I have had it for ten years and it still looks good and is a solid coat for temps of 0 degrees or warmer.  I don't layer anything else underneath it than my usual sweater and turtleneck.  For really cold days I have a down jacket that was once a zip in liner for a Columbia jacket.  It is toasty warm.

Calk

about 10 years ago

Ruthie, you took the words right out of my mouth! I too wear my Wintergreen Finnish blue jacket -- which is wonderful -- or my Columbia jacket with a liner. Love them both and survive winter fine with them.

topofthehillman

about 10 years ago

Buy local. Made in Bayfield.  Love it, love it, love it! (and so will YOU!)

http://www.wolfsongwear.com/mm5/merchant.mvc

The Big E

about 10 years ago

I've been admiring mid-level hooded down jackets for a couple of years, but the prices lead me to think that might be all I do.  Another part of me keeps thinking about spending half as much and buying an oldschool Air Force-style parka so I can re-enact The Thing[1] at home (and keep something really cool in the pocket on the sleeve).

[1] Bonus True Fact of the Day:  the day the last plane leaves the South Pole at the outset of the polar winter (when everyone who remains will be stuck for a couple months), it is traditional to get drunk and watch The Thing.  [I was intensely gratified when I heard that, because it's exactly what I would prescribe in those circumstances.]

zra

about 10 years ago

I used to have an extreme cold field jacket (the type E is referring to.) I was issued for deployments to Adak out in the Aleuts of Alaska...big, bulky, the snorkel is a bit constrictive but W.A.R.M.! I brought it to Minnesota and found it to be more than adequate for being outdoors.

Generally with bulky single layers, though is that after spending a couple of hours out in it (snowshoeing, whathaveyou, etc...), you're left with very few options when you start to overheat, which sours the event.

If you don't spend a whole lot of time outside doing things in the winter, then big and bulky is for you.

topofthehillman

about 10 years ago

If it's good enough for the prez....

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/01/06/obama-times-square-billbo_n_413658.html

Jeff

about 10 years ago

Thanks for all the advice, appreciate it.

Jen

about 10 years ago

check out the gear at www.empirecanvasworks.com - this is made right here in Duluth.

Jeff

about 9 years ago

Just thought I'd make a final post on this subjet.    I picked up a Lands End SnowSystem coat and after a full winter I've got to say, it's the warmest coat I've ever owned and if I went into layering I don't think there's any local weather it couldn't handle.  No complaints about it at all. Thanks for all the input.

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