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Dog-friendly Duluth

I was reading comments to convince my girlfriend, and saw one reader post that Duluth is sooo dog friendly.

We have just moved from the Twin Cities and I have struggled finding dog-friendly places. Where we lived in the Cities, there were huge dog parks with hiking trails where we could safely let our dog off-leash (and get exercise ourselves), dog-friendly businesses to visit, dog day cares, cafes you could bring your dog, and a lot of special events. (It probably helped that there are publications like Sidewalk Dog to point you in the right direction).

The one tiny dog park in Duluth is inadequate to say the least (we won’t visit again), and while I’ve heard about the Superior Hiking Trail, in many places in Duluth it seems too close to roads to feel comfortable letting my dog off leash (also am not sure how easy it would be to hike it in the winter).

So, dog owners — what are your tips for great places to bring your dog? Where can you let your dog off-leash? I work in Duluth and am staying in Cloquet until we find a permanent place to settle, so am curious about any Cloquet/Esko tips as well.

Thanks!

54 Comments

Cory

about 10 years ago

I agree!  I live in the cities but visit Duluth often and there isn't many places to take your dog off leash that consists of more then a .5 acre fenced-in rectangle in West Duluth. Sorry but my dog is all about running and hiking not sniffing asses with 10 other dogs in a joke of a dog park.  

Luckily my dog is friendly, listens when called and heals when told so I just risk it on the trails in the area and let her free. If I see someone coming I call her back to heel.  Sorry if some people get pissed but it is what it is.

As for good places to risk it... Any of the more remote trails around town are good. Sucker River is a great place to hike off leash, Jay Cooke is also a good place once you get back into the deeper trails.

Bret

about 10 years ago

Lester Park and around Hawk Ridge has a lot of off leash trails.  Also, if you drive up Seven Bridges Road now (during the winter) you'll come to a place where the road is closed off for the winter season and you can walk up the remainder of Seven Bridges Road, up a nice trail along Amity Creek, or along Hawk Ridge Road (Skyline Parkway).  You can even walk up the snowmobile trail along Amity Creek and cut through a nice stand of Red Pines to Skyline Parkway.

Also, the trail at the end of Park Point, or along the beach, is nice for off leash walking.  I'm not sure if this area is officially off leash (the above at Lester is), but in practice it is and works well.

Also, there's a nice private dog park at Harbor City Kennel on Jean Duluth Road.  You have to pay $5, but it has nice trails, woods, a pond, etc.

chadp

about 10 years ago

Hawk Ridge is a great place to run the dogs.  The road is closed for the winter and it is mostly an unofficial off leash park.  The only problem with it being unofficial some people don't pick up the poo.  It is very disgusting during the spring thaw.

Ryan Huggett

about 10 years ago

The Fitgers Mall is dog friendly

wildreed

about 10 years ago

Thanks guys! Is there a map anywhere of some of these trails? I know Jay Cooke somewhat, and know there are trail maps once you get out there. I'm not really sure where Sucker River or Lester Park are. I really wish the city had a parks and trails map on its web site but haven't been able to find one.

chadp

about 10 years ago

Directions
http://www.hawkridge.org/about/directions.html

trail map
http://www.hawkridge.org/about/HRmap_color.pdf

kerc

about 10 years ago

Technically Lester is an on-leash park. Practically though you could walk for miles and miles (in summer) and be fine. Don't walk on groomed ski trails though (and the trails are mostly ski trails).

Also be careful at Hawk Ridge because there are snowmobilers that use the mixed use trail.

Beverly

about 10 years ago

The News Tribune has a nice hiking trails guide:
http://sections.duluthnewstribune.com/trails.html

Karasu

about 10 years ago

Be careful of porcupines at Jay Cooke in the away-from-the-river areas. Bring some pliers.

Most people go off-leash at Hartley.

vicarious

about 10 years ago

I was operating on the assumption that the territory north of Hinckley was considered "off-leash".

Kidding aside, if you pick up your dog's poopy and leash them when approaching other dogs/humans, then the expanse of Park Point should be a safe Freedom of Canine area. 

Though, there are those "I own Park Point" residents of Park Point who will tighten their sphincter upon seeing a loose dog on "their" beach. My advice upon encountering this species is to:

1. Ignore them entirely despite their froth
2. Laugh heartily at them
3. Placate them by saying, "Gosh! I'm sooo sorry".

starfire

about 10 years ago

I told an old lady (PP Resident) to FUCK OFF once. Not my proudest moment. She hated my Dogs.

vicarious

about 10 years ago

Starfire's tactic is probably the most immediately effective.

Mary

about 10 years ago

Arrgghh! I am someone who is extremely afraid of dogs and someone who likes to walk in all of the above parks mentioned.  I can't tell you the amount of times I have been freaked out by loose dogs in these parks.  In Hartley once I was walking with a friend and a large fluffy white dog came bounding towards me while his owner feebly attempted to get the dog to heel.  The dog lunged at me and left two muddy paw prints on my white shirt. Most dog owners think their dog is ok to let loose -- it's other people's dogs.  I am afraid to walk a lot of places by myself because of dogs.  That doesn't seem right to me.

wildreed

about 10 years ago

See, Mary? Even non-dog owners should help us advocate for dog parks (for *good* ones) ... I know that was partially why they built our dog park in Chanhassen ... they wanted to provide an off-leash area people wanted to go to, to reduce conflicts.

Craig

about 10 years ago

Mission Creek in West Duluth. A vast expanse of wooded trails. Not a soul there when I was hiking there on a Sunday afternoon last summer.

Scott

about 10 years ago

In Lincoln Park I generally let my dog off her leash when hiking up the trail along Miller Creek, and sometimes in the wide-open area near the pavillion.  Lots of dog owners come here, and they appreciate letting dogs socialize with one another.

hbh1

about 10 years ago

What does "unofficially off-leash" mean, really? Well, seems to me, as someone who walks my dog on his long-reel leash frequently, it means y'all have just *decided* to walk your dogs off-leash... and then others with dogs see you and decide to do the same. How many of you who do this are *really* capable, without fail, of making your dog come to you immediately when called? Not only have I been jumped on by a strange dog and yelled at for "allowing" him to do so (which was so inexplicable I don't even know how it happened) while he destroyed my wild mushroom dinner, at least half the time when I'm walking my large mellow husky-mix, I've got people yelling feebly at their dogs while the dogs, sometimes two at at time, surround my dog or get aggressive at him.

I *really* wish those people would stop walking the trails near Hartley with their dogs off-leash. You make me quite uncharacteristically interested in cattle prods.

de'muench

about 10 years ago

I am really glad you started this thread. I appreciate all sides of this story.

I should say most of Duluth is dog friendly ... not just the places but the people. I lived in MPLS near one of the largest probably nicest dog parks I've ever been to and I had more negative experiences with people and their dogs there than I have had here.
 
I cautiously let my dogs off leash because they have proven time and time again to be friendly and respectable of people and their dogs.  One of my dogs really could care less about other people and dogs.  He's kind of a wall flower.  

There was once this beautiful day and we were walking all through Hartley, probably for more than two hours, and we had accidentally ventured off the hiking trail and onto the bike/ped trail.  I felt so guilty having the boys interrupt what looked like some seriously fun biking.  But each and every biker [had to have been 20 or so] were so kind and understanding even stopping to pet my guys.  It really made me feel good about living here.  Time and time again people in Duluth are 110 times more kind than people in the Twin Cities.

One thing I do is keep the dogs tethered to me until I am familiar with my surrounding [distance to roads and streams and how generally crowded it can be] and until have been to a local park/trail more than twice.  

Park Point is a blessing for dogs and dog lovers ... just don't try to venture down there on a hot Saturday afternoon and expect to keep them off leash.  Early morning on weekends and after work have been great.  'Member to pick up the poo'.  We want to keep Superior clean!

Also, I too used to be deathly afraid of dogs.  The sound of their pitter patter coming up behind me would make my blood run cold.  Obviously I overcame that fear, but let me say how sorry I am for anyone who has ever been afraid around my boys.   

Ohmygosh this comment is way too long, I need to shut up.

PS>  Hawk Ridge has been great this winter so far, just keep an ear out for snowmobiles.

eco eco

about 10 years ago

Pet peeve (get it?): People (it turns out to be everyone who owns a dog) who say their loose dog is always under control so they have a right to ignore leash laws. I stopped hiking Chester Creek because of these poeple and because I couldn't decide whether I'd rather throw the charging dog or the owner over the cliff.

MJ

about 10 years ago

Places to walk and run your dogs aside, Duluth is not pet friendly if you're a renter.  Before I owned my home, I had an awful time trying to find places to live that would allow my two cats, and I was willing to pay extra!  I imagine renting with dogs is even more difficult.  Something to keep in mind.

mdt

about 10 years ago

Agreed ... renting is tough.
I've been very lucky to find a dog loving landlord. 

eco eco ... wow ... violent speech like that scares me.
If you are upset words are better.

Will

about 10 years ago

I love dogs, but I am okay with requiring dogs be kept on leashes and not being allowed into restaurants and businesses.

I say this gently, but dogs are like chilren in that everyone thinks his or her own is an angel. No one thinks his or her dog could possibly do anything wrong, but really even the best behaved dog will still run away, snap at someone, cause some damage, etc. That's just what dogs do. I also prefer not to deal with a dog's smell, hair or presence when I am eating or running errands.

Drifter

about 10 years ago

On Thursdays and Sundays, Boulder Lake Management Area's ski trails are open for skijoring (cross country skiing with a dog or dogs).

wildreed

about 10 years ago

Like a few of the critics have suggested, my dog is great most of the time, but I know she's still a dog and there are times she will chase after a rabbit or bark at people. That's why the dog parks in the Cities worked so great -- everyone there fully expected dogs running loose. Keeping them on a leash all the time isn't an option. They need to run and smell (at their own pace) and greet other dogs. I appreciate all the ideas people have suggested, the tips for keeping dogs safe, and the reminders for being a responsible dog parent. I adore Duluth and am looking forward to exploring it with my dog, and maybe I really will decide that Duluth is more dog-friendly than the Twin Cities.

Resolut

about 10 years ago

Ok, ok, keep the dog on the leash, paint in the lines, restaurants have to follow the health codes, dogs are filthy (praise allah?), people get scared, yadda yadda. get over it.  

I sometimes don't leash my dog in downtown mpls, and I'm certainly not going to leash on the sht. It kinda seems like some of the haters need a good sloberry lickin to cheer them up.  Seems to me it'd be a better world with dogs everywhere galavanting all happy like, tails wagging. People have something to learn from dogs easy going socializing style. A new dog comes through the gate, they all come say hello, then the newbie is part of the pack off running as if it's a perfect duluth day.

Or you could be a cities-type dog owner and carry your dog out to pee, set it down where you want it to go and then start yelling at it to pee.  (not realizing that sniffing, walking, and circling is how a dog preps for their business) Then, heaven forbid, a dog comes to say hi, and they quick snatch up the poor thing, inadvertantly telling the dog, 'be very afraid.' This method raises some real annoying and terrified yippers.

TimK

about 10 years ago

I feel sorry for dogs having been forced into bizarre breeds and specializations by humans. I wonder what the world would be like if we did that with alligators or emus. "Hey, get you damned slobbering alligator off of my crotch!"

frank nichols

about 10 years ago

I got attacked by off lease dog in Hartley. Got me right in the jaw, but my beard saved me. Lady got upset when I complained.

Tony D.

about 10 years ago

The ironic thing about leashes is that they actually can create problems: when one dog is leashed and another is not, the leashed dog often becomes defensive because its mobility is limited and it feels vulnerable. The unleashed dog, sensing an opportunity to show dominance, can then sometimes get aggressive, and trouble can ensue. Or we owners ourselves create an issue by acting upset and nervous, yelling at one another which our dogs pick up on and respond to: remember, a dog's first instinct is to protect the pack. It happens: they're dogs, not people. Usually if you just let them sniff each other everything is just fine. One of them might growl or gesture toward a nip, but once again that is more about establishing dominance than a prelude to a fight.

Zim

about 10 years ago

Behind St Scholastica is an awesome place for safe dog walking off leash.... I hardly ever see anyone back there during the day. I would NEVER walk Congdon with my dog off leash- a former ED doc punched my dog in the face there; and a old man with 2 small dogs on leash once beat my pooch with a stick when she approached him at Lester. WATCH OUT for snowmobiler on Hawk's Ridge!!!

Jude

about 10 years ago

Regarding dogs on the Superior Hiking Trail. 

(From the SHTA Website http://www.shta.org/)

The trail has 81 backcountry campsites. There are no fees, reservations, or permits required to hike or backpack on the trail. Dogs are allowed on the trail but must be on a leash at all times. For more information about backpacking, click here. 

I am an avid hiker on Lester, SHTA, Hartley, etc.  I am a dog lover.  But often unleashed dogs on these trails run towards me, jump up, sniff, etc. while the owner is lollying along, saying "Buddy, Buddy, COME HERE Buddy or whatever the name and the dog is doing its thing.  When owners have well-behaved and leashed dogs I most always compliment them on their manners.  I once had (RIP) had a huge Chesapeake dog who was gentle as a lamb but could look in the window of anyone's car when they drove up.  Terrified lots of people.  But this was in our yard, not on a public trail that says dogs have to be on a leash.  Those rules are for a reason, thanks to all the dog lovers who abide by them.   And not to mention all that poop at Hartley that I don't appreciate. Ever gotten poop in your snowshoe?  Ack.

Mary

about 10 years ago

I'm not the same Mary as the one who previously posted in this discussion, but I have some of the same anxieties about dogs running up to me so I thought I'd speak up.  (I got hurt by a big dog when I was a little kid, and even though my rational mind knows the dog didn't mean to do it, I've never been fully comfortable around big dogs ever since.)  

I totally understand people wanting the freedom to let their dogs run around off-leash, and generally, I don't have a problem with it; but I do think those who do it should be especially mindful of their dog's behavior, and of not assuming that everyone they bump into is eager for that interaction.  I guess it boils down to respect -- respecting other people's desires to have fun with their dogs, and respecting others' desires to not have fun with your dogs.

krlars

about 10 years ago

We moved from the Plaza Area a while ago...but you used to be able to bring your dog into Mr. Movies as the Plaza.  We have also been told fairly recently to bring our dog into Sivertson's Gallery (and didn't because he's a little crazy and we had our toddler also and that was asking for trouble).  The Duluth Pack store has a water dish inside.  Cold Stone in Canal Park has water outside in the summer.  And we used to bring him on the deck at Little Angies- but haven't tried that for a while.

digit3

about 10 years ago

First off I would be as likely to take my dog to a "dog park" as I would to Petco. Nice breeding grounds for diseases.

The SHTA is mostly on public land. I am nice and have decided not to ride my MTB on these trails. I also have supported the SHTA effort financially but I would NEVER even consider leashing my dog on the trail. 

Would be a different story if my dog was an aggressive or overly horny male.

I walked Congdon today! Never been an issue with me nor my wife and our dog. Sure would hate to be the person that punched my pooch in the face.

Finally, although Park Point is awesome for dogs and humans alike, I never go to the trail at the end of the airport from say June-October due to the profusion of poison ivy that my dog could run through and subsequently though my legs.

vicarious

about 10 years ago

My hound is very attracted to the HUGE patch of poison ivy next to the radio tower at the 22nd St. beach parking lot. Thank Jeebus, I am immune to poison ivy.

RE: The SHTA on-leash "law" - The human-made rule that dogs cannot run free on the earth is absurd. Lizards and squirrels have just as much right to make "land-use" laws as humans. And I am neither a hippie nor a vegan!

Glass.half.empty.

about 10 years ago

Ha!  "Human made laws" indeed....but, then again, I haven't heard of many reports of people being mauled, bitten, or attacked by "lizards and squirrels".  

I can't tell you the number of times I have heard of someone's precious "Smoogins" biting someone.  Even though you think that your dog is friendly and loving, others can't tell that your dog is not a threat.  And besides, your loving dog may think that you are under attack and try to protect you.  For example, growing up I had a super friendly and loving mutt ("Stimpy") that would never hurt a fly....years of peace and love, this dog was truly an awesome animal...until one day he tried to bite the face off of the UPS delivery guy, for no (apparent/provoked) reason.  

It just boils down that sometimes we need to sacrifice a bit of our individual liberty (such as to let our animals run free) for the safety and welfare of the general public.

So, back to the original question...a good place to bring your dog.  Hawk Ridge is the best, honestly.

MarshaH

about 10 years ago

If yu don't mind paying, there is a wonderful members only dog park at Harbor City Kennels on Jean Duluth Road. Here is the link:
http://s413.endeavorpreview.biz/dogpark.htm
Enjoy!

Prof. Cricket

about 10 years ago

Hi, I am Prof. Cricket a Jack Russell and I hate it when dogs run toward me, which happens in Chester Creek. I have a Napoleon complex and I never give up.  Owners shout out how friendly their dog is to my mom or dad. Yeah, but I just don't want them running up to me no matter how friendly they are it's part of my genetic code to always be on guard.
Mom and dad gave up on walking me in Chester Creek on Sundays...to many "nice, friendly dogs running around."

TimK

about 10 years ago

Prof. Cricket- don't you realize that other dogs don't care what you think? Dog owners obviously know what's best for other people (and other dogs)who use public spaces. Remember, the world revolves around them.

Nick L

about 10 years ago

Keane Creek dog park is the only City park where your dog can be legally unleashed.  The Parks & Rec Commission just discussed dog parks 2 days ago.  There's a huge need for dog parks and designated off-leash areas.  Duluth is in a Catch 22.  The City doesn't have $ and no group's willing to fundraise.  A tiny dog park on the Lakewalk got shot down last summer over funding and neighbor concerns.  So dog owners walk their dogs off-leash prompting the #1 complaint to Parks & Rec: unleashed dogs bothering people.  

Solution?  I'm on the Parks & Rec Commission and we have vacancies.  Or if you're interested in creating a dog park or unleashed dog trail area, we'd love to help.  Please contact me at [email protected]

EvilResident

about 10 years ago

I have a GIANT fluffy white dog. She doesn't bark (ever, unless she's asleep), she doesn't bite (ever), and she's generally into avoiding people she doesn't know. She's ridiculously friendly and happy, and she's pretty well-behaved.

I would never in a million years even dream about letting her off of her leash in public. I care about my dog too much to risk her safety like that. You never know when another dog will come along that may be aggressive... or a person for that matter.

Leash laws are there for a reason. I absolutely LOVE dogs, but growing up, we had one that was a bit on the aggressive side. She was great with our family, but not so much with other people or dogs. When walking her, we always kept her leashed, and nothing drove us more INSANE than when somebody else's dog would approach her on park point (or wherever) and the other person would say some inane thing like, "OH DON'T WORRY LOL MY DOG IS FRIENDLY LOL."

I always wanted to punch them in the face. YOUR dog may be your perfect angel, but MINE isn't. MY dog will ATTACK your illegally-unleashed dog, and then YOUR dumb ass will have MY dog put down, and all because YOU werent' following the law and keeping your dog leashed. Yes, our dog wasn't a people-dog, but we loved her, and she was great for our family, and we did what we could to protect her.

She finally died of old age, thankfully, but these fears were always very prevalent. I dont' want to make her out to have been a monster, but she just had bouts of unpredictability (it stemmed from having been almost strangled as a puppy when she got tangled up in something when we weren't home).

Long story short - keep your dog leashed unless you're POSITIVE nobody else around minds. Share the parks.

maria

about 10 years ago

I will never stop running my dog off leash. We just try to avoid crowds and on leash dogs, which means we generally don't run in Chester, Hartley ski trails, or lower Lester Park. Upper Lester, Park Point trail, SHT, and Hartley bike trails are our usual spots. On leash dogs usually cause trouble (as Tony D. said) so I leash to get by them. Just turn your dog loose people and keep walking. Don't stand and hover. They'll work it out. 

If your dog has to be leashed because it's poorly managed and aggressive, walk in on the Lakewalk or streets where all the dogs are leashed. Or train and socialize it.

wildreed

about 10 years ago

Nick - glad there is someone from the Park and Rec commission reading this! Given that Duluth doesn't have funds to create *new* parks, what about choosing some of the *existing* parks and trails to be "legally" off-leash areas? That way dog owners know where they are legally allowed to let their dogs off-leash (and these should be large areas with hiking trails, not a tiny yard like Keene Creek), and people who are afraid of dogs or would rather not deal with them know that they should avoid those areas. At least that way you separate the potential for conflict, without spending much money (other than perhaps signage)?

veryfine

about 10 years ago

since we're using violent words here ... if you ever hit my dog, an off-leash dog chasing you will be the last of your worries you can count on it.

mdt

about 10 years ago

FROM the DNT Jul. 22, 2008 -  Beginning next spring, you can take your dog out on three city trails and let them run free. That is, as long as you have a special license that will cost about $30 a year per dog. 

On Monday, the Duluth City Council approved an ordinance allowing unleashed dogs to use certain trails. The trail sites chosen are at Twin Ponds, Amity Creek and Birchwood Park. The trails aren't currently used for hiking, skiing or snowmobiling. In all, about 10 miles of trails will be designated for unleashed dogs.

http://www.duluthmn.gov/clerk/council/resord08/08-0341r.htm

wildreed

about 10 years ago

mdt - thanks for the link to the City Council ordinance. I see that the ordinance has several stipulations, including that the trail areas be fenced and that someone be assigned to run the areas without cost to the city. I'm wondering if these stipulations were ever met and if the trails are now functioning as the ordinance allows?

Nick L

about 10 years ago

The dog park stipulations haven't been met.  Only the Rice Lake Road area has to be fenced. 

It would not be hard for a group to set up trails in one or more of the areas.  I can't speak for the P&R Commission but it's extremely likely we'd help a group get this done. Our biggest role would be guiding you through the City process and helping make sure the trails are built properly.

Cory Fechner

about 10 years ago

Leash free - feel the freedom...

Karli Miller

about 10 years ago

I am a journalist for UMD who is planning on writing a article about the lack of dog parks in Duluth. Everyone who commented seems to have some strong opinions. 

I would really appreciate it if any of you would be willing to talk to me, it would really help out with my article. If you are willing to speak with me, please contact me by my email: [email protected]

I would really appreciate it. Thank you so much.

Kevin

about 9 years ago

Quick question, I bike a lot and was chewed out for being on a non bike trail. I do understand that I am not allowed to be there so I was in the wrong, but the person getting upset had his dogs (plural) off leashes. I was not going fast at all, the same pace as a hiker would. My only question, is there a leash law in all of Duluth? Or at least in upper chester? Because he was very proud to have said something to me, where-as I was pretty sure his dogs needed to be leashed as well. So any comments on whether there is a full city leash law, mainly upper chester park? I love seeing people walking dogs and have no problem with it and I was not doing anything to cause a problem in no way, the man just became really upset to see a biker enjoying the trails in a controlled manner. Thanks.

DuluthDailyPhoto

about 9 years ago

Yes, there is a leash law, no matter where you are, except in a dog park.

Here is Duluth Municipal Code:

 (a) No dogs, cats or other domestic pets, or cattle, horses, mules, swine, sheep, goats or fowl shall be turned into or allowed to run at large upon any park.  Dogs, cats and other domestic pets shall be considered to be at large if they are not under control of the owner or other responsible person by means of a leash  of suitable strength not exceeding six feet in length;     

(b) The director of parks and recreation may designate any park or area in a park as prohibited to pets or other animals.  Any area so designated shall be clearly marked by signs indicating such prohibition. No person owning, controlling or caring for any animal shall allow such animal to enter any park area where such animal is prohibited. (Ord. No. 3, 8-26-1892, § 6; Ord. No. 8545, 11-10-1980, § 2.)     

Dogs are not allowed to sleep or nap in barbershops or beauty salons in Duluth, Minnesota. It illegal to let a any animal sleep in a bakery.

http://www.xmission.com/~emailbox/loonylaws.htm

Cindy Wright

about 9 years ago

I am planning a trip to Duluth and am an owner of a Siberian Husky...a rather big dog, to say the least.  I'm looking for places to stay, things for us to do, etc.  He is like my child...and of course, I think he is an angel, but just like my stepdaughter, he can be naughty and not listen, especially when he has "oooh shiny" moments and his attention is diverted elsewhere.

When we walk anywhere outside of our complex's dog-run, he is on a leash.  Its not that he won't come when I call or that I fear he'll attack anyone or another dog; I do this for his safety.  Too many children are quick to just approach the "wolf", since thats how he looks.  Some kids are great to ask first and my dog will actually put his head down when he wants them to come forward and pet him, but he also gets too excited at times and can easily push a child down just my licking them...the leash gives me really good control of him so he doesn't overpower a smaller person by accident.  

The more dog owners that are responsible, the more our dogs will be accepted by non-dog-loving people. I am also a big pusher for picking up the poop...I see many dog owners not do this and its annoying.  Most likely, thats why the snobs at Park Point don't like seeing dogs on the beach.  As dog owners, we all need to make sure we're doing all we can to get acceptance of our pers.

Jan Olson

about 8 years ago

I'm a 40+year resident of Park Point, have always had a dog friend, and have been a constant steward of the lake and the narrow sand spit I call home.  I wish people wouldn't generalize about us ("snobs" etc) but then it's seems to be human nature to categorize a whole group based on a conflict with one person.  I know that when my dog and I walk the beach I pick up anything he leaves behind!  I do this because I care about Lake Superior's water quality, I'm concerned about children and adults that play on the beach, I hate walking through dog poop and, I clean up after my dog in whatever neighborhood we stroll.  If I have my dog off-leash I always return him to the leash when others come toward me.  Some people love to be approached by dogs, others don't.  Some dogs love to be approached by other dogs, some don't.  It seems logical to me that if one is a responsible dog owner he or she would also be a responsible human being.

BeastOfBurden

about 8 years ago

Question: If your dog takes a dump, and it goes into the lake, how is it any different than the millions of other animals that crap in the woods and neighborhoods of Duluth?  Shall we clean up after the coyotes in Hartley as well?  What about the rabbits that have infested Park Point?  And the drunks pissing in the alleyways downtown?

Dog feces have little to do with bacteria levels in Lake Superior.  It's been that way for a long, long time.

spy1

about 8 years ago

My dog's been sleeping in the bakery for years, after they kicked us out of the barber shop.

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