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St. Louis River Posts

Selective Focus: The St. Louis River, Contemplative Space

Sharon Mollerus

Sharon Mollerus, “Water Lillies”

OneRiverMN-Logo-FC-BadgeI was fortunate to spend my first Arrowhead New Years Eve in a cabin in Jay Cooke State Park; bird watching, snow-shoeing, and far from the inebriates (though I did bring a flask). Even photographed a ghost buck (pictured below), warmed by a cedar and oak fire as a soft snow fell to welcome 2016. It was a grand introduction to the St. Louis River.

For the next two weeks Selective Focus will take part in the “One River, Many Stories” project which asks for tales of your relationship to this unique watershed. This week we’re concentrating on the river’s abundant natural beauty; a place for restive contemplation, and awe. Be sure to see the Duluth Art Institute’s kick-off the project on Monday, April 4, with a photo essay by Ivy Vainio, Tom Hollenhorst’s interactive maps, live drumming, and a video booth with PBS’s Karen Sunderman who’ll record your stories.

Marshall-Wells Paint

Marshall-Wells Paint

OneRiverMN-Logo-FC-BadgeNot sure if someone brought this sign to the Western Waterfront Trail and propped it up for public display for some reason or if it was dredged out of the St. Louis River. One River, Many Stories is upon us. Maybe you know the story. Fact or fiction would be fine.

An Epic Voyage to Whiteside (Clough) Island

Aerial views of Clough Island in the St. Louis River estuary, Duluth, Minnesota.

OneRiverMN-Logo-FC-BadgeThis is my contribution to the One River, Many Stories project, and is epic as ever. Right here, on this fascinating island within the St. Louis River estuary, a millionaire built a large vacation home and an impressive farm that may have been the largest in the area. Here they harvested 3,500 bushels of wheat in a season, kept pigs, trained numerous racing horses, tended a herd of black angus cows, kept 40 brown swiss milking cows at one time, had 500 sheep, cared for an enormous vegetable garden, and much much more.

This was a quest to uncover remnants of the past and be immersed into an incredible story. What I discovered on kayak, on foot, and by personally meeting the author of the only book on the subject, was most surprising. See more at Ed’s Big Adventure, and perhaps be inspired to see this place for yourself.

Beauty Within the Torrent

OneRiverMN-Logo-FC-BadgeWith the One River, Many Stories project poised to fully launch in April, we present this new video shot by Dudley Edmondson on the St. Louis River.

Welcome to Clough Island

Clough-1

Lake Superior & Mississippi Railroad will run in 2016

LSMRLake Superior & Mississippi Railroad, which recently made VacationIdea magazine’s list of the “25 Best Things to See & Do in Duluth, Minnesota,” has been notified that the U.S. Steel clean up on the St. Louis River won’t start until the fall of 2016. So rail tours along the shoreline will return next summer.

Come on out and volunteer. You will meet some great people while having fun along the St. Louis River!

St. Louis River Corridor Parks Survey

slrcCommunity input is being sought by Duluth’s Parks and Recreation Department to develop mini-master plans for eleven neighborhood parks in the St. Louis River Corridor: Historical, Fond du Lac, Blackmer, Smithville, Riverside, Norton, Keene Creek, Grassy Point, Merritt, Harrison and Piedmont. Preliminary concept plans have been developed for the parks following public meetings held in September and October.

An online survey is available at the City of Duluth website.

Images of Spirit Mountain piping project on St. Louis River

More videos and images below and in the Google gallery linked here

Spirit Mountain’s piping project will draw water from the St. Louis River and pipe it to the lower chalet area where another pumping station will send it into the snow gun system. There are two pumping stations: one at the lower chalet area, the other right next to Tallas Island Bay on the Western Waterfront Trail in the Riverside neighborhood. That is the area these photos were taken.

St. Louis River photos from National Geographic

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On April 7, National Geographic published a photo gallery featuring images of the St. Louis River. The intro to the piece notes the St. Louis is “the eighth most endangered river in the U.S.,” according to a ranking by the advocacy group American Rivers.

Dude, don’t do it! You’ve got something to live for!

SuicideTurtle

Don’t worry, after contemplating his life at great length he eventually wandered off the railroad track.

Kayaking Cook Out at the Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve

The Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve, encompassing land on the Wisconsin side of the St. Louis River designated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to promote research, stewardship and outreach of our freshwater resources, would like to announce its first community event!

Saturday, Sept. 24, is dedicated as National Estuaries Day and the Lake Superior NERR is celebrating by hosting a Kayaking Cook Out on Barkers Island in Superior.

Become a Citizen Scientist!

Celebrate Earth Week by helping community organizations collect information about our world. Join St. Louis River Alliance Director Julene Boe to see what it’s like to get your hands wet and help out.

Great Lakes Aquarium will host a community class called “Becoming a Citizen Scientist.” At the class, St. Louis River Alliance will share its work and show you ways to get involved in citizen science!

Tuesday, April 19, 4:30-5:30 pm
Cost: Free; donations accepted.
All proceeds go toward stewardship efforts on the St. Louis River.

Contact Sarah Erickson at serickson @ glaquarium.org or 218-740-2007.

For more information, check out Community Education spring classes at Great Lakes Aquarium.

The St. Louis River Trail

A few weeks ago I was in Chambers Grove Park in far western Duluth when I saw a sign in the corner of the park for the St. Louis River Trail. A few days ago my wife and I returned to investigate it. After hiking a portion of the “trail” it seems that it is not maintained and I can’t find any information about it on the internet.

Anyone out there know about it? Is it even an official trail or did some guy just put the sign up? Is it merely in the planning stages? Whose property does the trail lie on? Minnesota Power’s? All I can say is that the walking was pleasant. Most of the “trail” followed an old rail line and there were many utility poles that had been cut down along the corridor. There is also the remains of an old railroad trestle at the point where we turned around.

If anyone has any more information about the St. Louis River Trail, it would be appreciated by this hiking enthusiast. I put a more detailed trip report up here:

The Continuing Adventures of Eric and Noelle
The St. Louis River Trail