Selective Focus: Vintage

Ava Francesca Battocchio

Ava Francesca Battocchio, “Nopeming”

Not an oenophile or single-malter in the house, eh? Not to worry, lots of other great takes on “vintage” this week. I even took some liberties to pair my Grandma Mohrbacher, on what looks like the Duluth pier (anyone?), with myself and my Grandpa’s Electrolux- a company he sold door-to-door for while living here in the ’20s. Fun facts.

Next week’s theme (because indecision drew more engagement than anything I’ve so far deliberated upon) will be “hypercaffeinated.” Send your unwatermarked, signature-less images by Wednesday at 11:59 p.m to tim @ perfectduluthday.com — 1000px at their largest dimension — along with title (if any), and URL of your website, Facebook page, Tumblr, or Flickr stream.

Cheryl Reitan

Cheryl Reitan, “Penny Dolls”

Kip Praslowicz

Kip Praslowicz, untitled

Ann Klefstad

Ann Klefstad, “The Third Bottle”

Brian Barber

Brian Barber, untitled

Brian Barber

Brian Barber, untitled

Tim White

Tim White, untitled

Tim White

Tim White, untitled

Cheryl Reitan

Cheryl Reitan, “Ooh La La”

Justin Anderson

Justin Anderson, untitled

Zach Kerola

Zach Kerola, “Nordy”

Guy Sander

Guy Sander, “Fill ‘er up”

2 Comments

Ava Francesca Battocchio

about 5 years ago

As a side note, related to "Nopeming Annex Room 201":

This picture was taken during a tour that was lead by the property owner and caretaker to discuss the preservation of the building. I initially decided to share it after watching the excitement spread across social media earlier this week.

With all the rumblings about the Nopeming Ghost Adventures episode airing this weekend,I just thought it was important to throw a "historical preservation PSA" out there.

I'm sure people are going to be really excited to try and head up there themselves to do a little "ghost hunting" in the Twin Ports, but as a friendly reminder: Nopeming is not abandoned. (Duluth News Tribune: Former Nopeming nursing home, sanitarium to be featured on 'Ghost Adventures' TV show)

There is a caretaker that lives in the facility along with his family. The campus is in the process of being saved with the hope that it can undergo a restoration project in the near future. Not only is the building patrolled frequently, but it is secured. To enter the building requires causing further damage to the facility. I would encourage you and anyone that you might know against this.

Further damage leads to decreased chances that the building will be able to be saved. 
I know it might seem like "just a broken window" but that allows for more water to get in. Minnesota roads are proof of what ice can do to rock.

So please, enjoy Ghost Adventures representing a part in our community. But please, enjoy from a distance.

Tim White

about 5 years ago

As someone who lives across from a noble structure in the wrecking ball's sights (St. Peter's Catholic Church), I fully agree with Ava Francesca's plea for respecting our history. Buildings are repositories of memories in much the way that people are. Cutting ourselves off from the history of individuals and places deprives us of depth, nuance, and makes us cultural amnesiacs. "Demolition by neglect" is a pernicious term that masks mercenary means to dodge preservation status, and similar hindrances to soulless aims like higher profits. Our imaginations need to be broader.

Zach Kerola's image "Nordy" has a place in this dialogue too: "The Northeastern Saloon, in Cloquet is one of the few buildings that survived the fire of 1918, even though the fire started a matter of blocks away from it. It used to be an old hotel with full amenities, and has been in business as a bar for the past decade. The owner is currently renovating the upstairs to make hotels again, however, he is not making the best progress. I would like to see it finished. It also houses the largest single wooden piece bar in Minnesota."

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