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Art Posts

Ken Bloom’s Tweevening

Ken Bloom packed the Tweed for a “Tweevening.”  Ken is a photographer who directs and occasionally curates shows, and as he retires, the Tweed is celebrating his medium.

Tweed director Ken Bloom to retire in June

Ken Bloom, director of the Tweed Museum of Art at the University of Minnesota Duluth since 2004, will retire in June. UMD’s School of Fine Arts made the announcement Friday afternoon, noting there will be a nationwide search for a new director.

Bloom will return to his lifelong photography career and continue to offer his accumulated museum and artistic expertise as a freelance curator and consultant.

Francis Chapin at the Art Institute of Chicago

Railroad Yard, Duluth, 1918–1965

There are a few works by Francis Chapin at the Art Institute of Chicago. More info about Chapin can be found on Wikipedia.

Coal Depot, Duluth Harbor

Coal Depot, Duluth Harbor, Stuart David Klipper

The Art Institute of Chicago has many cool works of art with a Duluth connection available online.

Eric T. Anderson of Duluth

This photo of Eric T. Anderson, age 56 circa 1963, born in Duluth, is part of the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago. It was taken by Danny Lyon.

I don’t know the story or the man. Do you?

The Slice: Quiltfire

Scott “Starfire” Lunt’s quilt show is on display in the Kruk Gallery at the University of Wisconsin-Superior until the end of April.

In its series The Slice, WDSE-TV presents short “slices of life” that capture the events and experiences that bring people together and speak to what it means to live up north.

From Jinny Moe’s photography collection

Virginia “Jinny” Moe of Duluth donated this work to the the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Boy and Girl Holding Hands, ca. 1850, by Bennet.

Worden Day in Metropolitan Museum, via Julie Nunull Marshall

Another item at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is this item donated by Julie Nunull Marshall of Duluth. (I can’t find any records about her easily, beyond the record of generosity and taste.)

In the 1970s she donated Arcana II, 1969, by Worden Day to the Metropolitan.

Worden Day is now deceased, but immortalized by the generosity of a Duluthian.

Winifred E. Higgins in the Metropolitan Museum of Art

A huge collection of world art is available online at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This “charger” (which won’t do anything for my cell phone) was owned by Winifred E. Higgins, who lived at 2401 E. Second St. in Duluth.

The charger was manufactured by the Kalo Shops, which Wikipedia calls “the leading maker of Arts and Crafts movement silver in Chicago.”

(I didn’t know either — a “charger” is a plate that sits under the other plates.  Your server places your salad plate atop your charger, then your soup bowl atop your charger, then your dinner plate atop your charger, before the charger is removed for dessert.)

Duluth Flag Redesign Project

The city of Duluth is holding an initiative to redesign the city flag. All members of the public are encouraged to participate regardless of skill. The purpose of the project is to create a new symbol that all Duluthians can identify with. Submit ideas for the flag contest before Friday, April 12, at 5 p.m.

duluthmn.gov/duluthflagproject

Storming the Radisson

… with Emily Rose Olson and Emily Hayes.

Saturday Essays in Book Form

I have self-published a small book containing 15 essays. They comprise the lion’s share of the 17 essays which Perfect Duluth Day so kindly ran as part of the Saturday Essay series. It is available at Zenith Bookstore on Central Avenue in West Duluth next to Beaner’s Central.

Kathy McTavish named an inaugural Jerome Hill artist fellow

The Jerome Foundation has announced the first recipients of the new Jerome Hill Artist Fellowships program. Duluth-based artist Kathy McTavish was among the artists chosen from 1,172 applications.

Selective Focus: Justin Christopher Ayd

Justin Christopher Ayd has a close relationship with movies and film. He is working on a feature documentary project shot on the North Shore on super 8 and 16mm film, and explains why in a very digital age, celluloid is the right medium for this project. If you’d like to help out with the project, links are included below.

JCA: I work professionally in two fields simultaneously – filmmaking and film projection. Both aspects of film were introduced to me at a young age, filmmaking and the exhibition side, and by 1992 I knew I wanted to not only make movies, but be the person in the shadows running motion picture film for audiences.

No Empty Bowl?

WDIO tells me Empty Bowl is off, this year. I own five bowls, and I have probably broken five more — these things get used in my home. I love useful art, and Empty Bowl fills my heart and home with useful art.

Colleagues who throw pots as an art form worry that Empty Bowl hurts the market for pottery, but I would say that the twenty bucks I spent there would never have been spent on something in a gallery — it is the confluence of art and charity that makes Empty Bowl magic.

What is next for Empty Bowl? I don’t know, but I hope it returns.