Entrepreneur eyes West End for distillery

kevin-evans-photo-by-clint-austinKevin Evans, CEO of Duluth Whiskey Project LLC, is interested in opening a distillery at the former Franklin Foods facility on the 1900 block of West First St. in Duluth’s West End. The Duluth News Tribune reports the Duluth City Council could vote tonight on a resolution authorizing up to $50,000 for Barr Engineering Co. to conduct an environmental investigation of the former Arrowhead-Kemps dairy operation, which closed in 2013. The property is listed by Holappa Commercial Real Estate at $450,000.

Thanks, Duluth.


You may not attempt to sell a car while the car is parked on a street. You may, however, attempt to sell a car when driving the car. Good to know!

Speaking of which: 1986 Mercedes 300E – $3500

PDD Quiz: Bakeries of Duluth

emojiDuluth likes its baked goods, as evidenced by the many bakeries dotting the local landscape. How much do you know about them? Let’s find out!

Our next quiz will be on Oct. 2 and it will be a review of September 2016. Send your suggested questions to lawrence @ perfectduluthday.com by Wednesday, Sept. 28 for potential inclusion in the quiz.

Surly Knard 41

Chris Godsey Saturday EssayResponses to a piece I posted here a while ago suggest at least a few Perfect Duluth Day Saturday Essay readers ride bicycles somewhat “seriously.” Makes sense, I suppose; long cycling sojourns, solo or with accomplices, can foster a deep contemplation similar to one spending time with prose can evoke. It’s also true that riding bikes and reading words can both be nothing more than hardcore reality avoidance posing as time spent admirably. We all have our drugs, don’t we? — mostly ones we tell ourselves aren’t drugs so we can believe we’re better human beings than folks who used to hang out in front of Last Place on Earth.

But whatever. That’s not what this essay is about.

I ride a lot, slowly and clumsily (like a middle-aged oaf whose formative fitness years were spent playing tight end and fearing exercise-induced pain), mostly alone, and with intentions driven by equal desires to sit with and avoid my general mental state. Since 2002 I’ve owned a lot of different mountain, road, and commuting bicycles. After thousands of hours spent poring over Sheldon Brown’s website and mtbr.com forums, tinkering in my back-yard shed, and pestering real mechanics — just mercilessly badgering them with, “How does this work?” and “How do I put this back together?” and “Hey, can I come down and interrupt what you’re working on, ask a bunch of dumb questions, borrow some tools, and inevitably force you to stop what you’re doing and help me?” — I know enough to credibly build and maintain my own bikes. Sometimes I fix friends’ bikes, if they have low expectations. I go through nerdy periods of constantly trying to figure out the “best” way to set up a certain bike for a certain purpose, which means I’ve researched, bought, installed, un-installed, broken, replaced, and perseverated on hundreds of components ranging from whole frames to single 5mm bolts.

But even that’s not what this essay is about.

The Rumpus Interview with Connie Wanek

Connie WanekIn an interview for The Rumpus, an online magazine focused on culture, Duluth poet Connie Wanek discusses her latest book, the challenge of looking back at older poems, and what prioritizing writing looks like.

Link: The Rumpus Interview with Connie Wanek

Connie Wanek said that she only started writing poetry seriously in her late thirties, but since then, she’s been published in Poetry and the Atlantic Monthly, has received a Witter Bynner Fellowship at the Library of Congress, and been named a George Morrison Artist of the Year, among her many other honors. Her fourth book, Rival Gardens: New and Selected Poems, was released by the University of Nebraska Press this year, and makes the argument that she is one of contemporary America’s great poets.

Rachael Kilgour – “Rabbit in the Road”

Rachael Kilgour 2015Rachael Kilgour performed in KUMD’s Studio A this week in support of her upcoming album, Rabbit in the Road and her Sept. 11 performance at Sacred Heart music Center.

Selective Focus: Ryan LeMahieu


This week in Selective Focus, we hear from Ryan LeMahieu. If you click the images for a bigger view, you can better see the intricate line work in his drawings.

R.L.: my name is ryan lemahieu. i work mostly in mixed media but have a tendency to gravitate towards the black pen. you are nearly always able to find a pen and paper which is nice because art is how i deal with severe social anxiety with roots deep in depression. it is my release. i also think everything is better in black and white.

i wish i could purchase a t.v. that was black and white. does anyone know where i can find a black and white t.v. ?

i have been working on developing a “style’ for close to 20 years. i feel like i maybe finally figuring it out.

Duluth 1200 Fund Advance West Loan Program

West DuluthA new loan program designed to spur the revitalization of older stock commercial buildings and create jobs in West Duluth and West End business districts is detailed in a brochure released by the city of Duluth and the Duluth 1200 Fund Board. The program is intended to help with commercial building acquisition or improvements in the form of a loan up to $50,000 with opportunity to have up to one half of the balance forgiven, assuming program requirements are met.

The maximum amount of the loans will range between $10,000 and $20,000 per job created, up to the $50,000 limit. The loans are only available for commercial buildings in the 55806 and 55807 zip codes. The buildings must be owner occupied (not leased) by a small business committed to creating two or more full-time equivalent jobs within two years. Further details are available in the brochure below.

Book store will replace Wild West Liquor; other slow-moving changes in the works on Central Avenue in West Duluth

The former Wild West Liquor building on Central Avenue is being remodeled and new owners plan to open a used book store in the space next summer.

The former Wild West Liquor building, at left, is being remodeled and new owners plan to open a used book store there next summer.

A Carleton College professor and his wife have purchased a former West Duluth liquor store and plan to open a used book shop in a business district targeted by city officials for redevelopment.

Bob and Angel Dobrow of Northfield bought the Wild West Liquor building, 318 N. Central Ave., in July for $214,000 and plan to open Zenith Bookstore in the space next summer. The couple, along with friends and family, have gutted the 1890s building and exposed its original floors, tin ceilings and brick walls. They will eventually fill the store with thousands of books from their collection, recent purchases and new finds.

UW-Superior Opening Weekend 2016

UWS 2016Two weeks ago a video post on PDD showed clips from UMD Welcome Week. Here’s some equal time for the U across the bridge — scenes from opening weekend at the University of Wisconsin-Superior.

This year’s UWS freshmen come from 175 different high schools and from 11 states — including Alaska, California, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and obviously Wisconsin. Nearly 225 international students are attending this year, the largest and most diverse international enrollment in the university’s history.

Where in Duluth?


Itasca Conversations: Tales of Bovey (Part 1)

BoveyAgnes Hromyak, Lorraine Andrews, Ethel Deal, Patricia Walls and Meredith Jakovich meet at the Bovey City Hall Library to recount life growing up on the Iron Range. Video by A Plus B Productions.

Aerial Bridge and part of Wholesale Section

Aerial Bridge and part of Wholesale Section

The Color Run

color run 2016With the 2016 Color Run just two weeks away we take a glimpse at last year’s run through the eyes of James Gottfried.

A Dock at Duluth Where the Ore-fleet Coals

A Dock at Duluth