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History Posts

Duluth Milk Company

Duluth Milk Company

MPR News is running a series this week featuring photos by St. Paul native John Vachon, who worked for the Farm Service Administration and Office of War Information. From 1938 to 1943 he documented American life and how relief programs were helping those struggling through the Great Depression.

The image above is the only Duluth photo, but there are a few Iron Range and Beltrami County gems.

A look at Bunyan territory in 1939
Minneapolis’ milling history through John Vachon’s lens
Twin Cities streets at the end of the Depression
John Vachon captures Minnesota at work, 1939-1941
John Vachon captures Minnesota farm life at Depression’s end

Duluth in Stereoview

View in Duluth Harbor by P. B. Gaylord new

Ah, the stereograph — a nineteenth-century wonder in which almost identical photographs, side by side, can viewed with a stereoscope and appear three-dimensional. On a website they just appear silly and pointless, but in this case there’s some fairly fancy historical scenes to browse.

Lovit Soft Drinks from Fitger’s

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I read that Fitger’s made soft drinks during prohibition, but this wooden case I found doesn’t look all that old. Does anyone know when they stopped making soda?

Video Archive: Red Star Lounge opens in 2005

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32Ljdt5OALc

The footage above is from a party at the Red Star Lounge on April 20, 2005, celebrating the completion of construction and pending opening on April 22. Happy 10-year anniversary, Red Star! (Video by Starfire.)

When the geeks inherited the Earth

Ten years ago today the fourth iteration of Geek Prom was held at Pizza Lucé. The G4 cable network sent the Attack of the Show crew to Duluth to capture all the excitement.

Where should I get old photos copied?

Football_Guys

I stumbled across a great old photo of my grandfather. My siblings want copies. Where should I have it copied? I’m looking for someplace I can trust with an old and irreplaceable photo. Thanks for any advice!

In case anyone is wondering how we do things around here …

How we do things at Duluth

What happened to that poster from R. T. Quinlan’s men’s room?

Having spent several hours at R.T. Quinlan’s Saloon on Sunday, I was reminded of the framed poster that used to hang outside the toilet stall in the men’s room, next to the urinal. I thought there was a good chance an image of it might be available on the Internet somewhere, but my searches for “classic bathtubs, breasts” yielded only distractions.

Banner Photo Info: Where’s the Party?

pdd-banner_21

I found the graphic of all the banner photos, which was great fun to look at.  But I want to know: what’s going on in this photo?  Obviously a somber gathering, but what are the details? Of course, apologies if I just didn’t search well enough.

Joe Lundeen’s Shoes & Shoe Repairing

The re-siding job going on at the apartment building at 6301 Grand Ave. exposed this sign for Joseph A. Lundeen’s shoe shop. A quick search of city directories indicates Lundeen got his start with the Hartman Shoe Co. and by the mid-1920s went into business for himself in the Cormier Dry Goods building at 6227 Grand Ave. By 1950 he had moved across the avenue to the building shown above.

Icehouse Pillar’s Final Resting Spot

https://vimeo.com/121192879

In a follow-up to the “Has a little of Uncle Harvey gone missing?” caper, the Duluth News Tribune reported on Sunday that a three-person team of St. Louis County Rescue Squad members, working with a remotely operated underwater vehicle, located the concrete column from Uncle Harvey’s Mausoleum largely intact on Saturday afternoon in about 9 feet of water. City Pages put together this edit of the underwater video.

Inside a Duluth trolley car — Aug. 2, 1922

Duluth Trolley 2-Aug-1922

Has a little of Uncle Harvey gone missing?

Harvey1 harvey2

Mike Scholtz’s photos of the sand- and gravel-hopper ruins known as “Uncle Harvey’s Mausoleum” suggest the round column near the shore collapsed at some point in recent days. The photo at left is from 2013. The photo at right is from today.

Postcards from Duluth’s ore docks

Duluth, MN, Mammoth Ore Docks, Aeroplane View, c1920s

Duluth’s first ore dock was built in 1893, just east of 34th Avenue West. The Duluth, Missabe and Northern Railway built several docks there for loading iron ore from the Iron Range for shipment to steel plants in the East. The first five docks were built of wood, which was gradually replaced by steel and concrete.

An Incline Railway Mystery

Incline Debris 01

I’m back again with another mystery! Way back in October of 2006, I was exploring the topmost bit of overgrown sidewalk on Seventh Avenue West, (between Skyline and West Eighth Street). This walkway ran parallel to east side of the old Incline Railway, which pedestrians would have used as access for each stop along the way. At the top at West Eighth Street, where the sidewalk first begins, I happened to notice off to the side in the overgrowth, a large pile of of steel girders and wooden posts, located right about where the incline once stood.