Why does the City of Duluth hate wildflowers and butterflies?

 

Here in Lakeside we love our extension of the Lakewalk. One of the best features are all the wildflowers that grow along the fence, including stands of milkweed which is essential for Monarch butterflies.

So, I was shocked today to see City crews with weed whips cutting down the wild flowers along the fence.

Who could have thought this was a good idea? And how can we tell that person to stop destroying this wonderfully beautiful and diverse wildflower habitat?

4 Comments

Sonya

about 3 months ago

It stinks that they cut down the milkweed, but most of what I can see in this photo--tansy, oxeye daisy, European bellflower, and thistle--are invasive weeds that crowd out and destroy habitat for native wildflowers (like milkweed) which would be a much better food source for local pollinators and other critters. It'd be great if there were native wildflower and grasses along the fenceline, but somebody would have to prepare the site, plant it, maintain it, and pay for it all. Personally, I'd rather see a weedy margin instead of boring, mown-flat turf, if only for aesthetic reasons, but this is not the "diverse wildflower habitat" you think it is.

bluenewt

about 3 months ago

Native plants would be better, but wild bees and honeybees do use those weedy flowers for pollen and nectar.

Bret

about 2 months ago

I agree that natives are a better option. But, it seems the choice here is living and aesthetically pleasing flowers that still feed pollinators and those plants laying dead in piles along the fence. I'm not sure why Duluth is spending money to do the latter.

Shane

about 2 months ago

Tansys need to be cut once in a while, otherwise they take over everything. A couple of years ago they were so thick that the cars had a hard time seeing the train cross at 51st. I saw more than one near miss at the crossing there.

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