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Wish List for New Downtown Bike Station?

The Duluth Transit Authority is on a fast track for construction of its new Multimodal Transportation Center in downtown Duluth.

When it opens, the center will be a hub for multiple modes of transportation, including the main transit station for DTA buses and other inter-city bus lines, public and private parking, a reconstructed walkway between the downtown to the DECC and the first of its kind in Duluth, a bike station.

What this bike station looks like is where your help is needed.

Bike Stations are also called centers and hubs.  They can be as simple as a secured bicycle parking facility to as a much as a full service bike repair, retail shop and café.  Examples of existing bike stations are located on the Twin Cities U of M campus and in downtown St. Louis, MO.

Here are some possible elements and set-ups of bike stations:

Bike station membership
Secure Bicycle (only) storage
24 hour access
Showers/lockers/restrooms

Bike repair
Professional Staff
Self-serve tune-up area
Tune-ups/repairs while you work

Bike shop
Café/dining area
Bike rentals (standard, used, abandoned, bike share)
Retail store (accessories, bikes & components)

Community
Classes for bicycle education and/or bicycle repair
Public meeting areas
Police Bike Patrol headquarters
Advocacy groups and other organizations

Management structure
Local bike shop
Cooperative
Joint public-private venture

Public comments will be presented to the DTA as part of the design-build construction process that is already in full swing.

If you are interested in being part of designing Duluth’s first Bike Station, mention your ideas and preferences here.  Or you can contact us directly (“us” = transportation planners) via our project webpage.

 

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7 Comment(s)

  1. If there’s a bike station, lockers would be a handy ammenity.

    TimK | Jul 10, 2012 | New Comment
  2. Would love to have a safe, handy space for a few kids bikes and/or bike trailer. Took the kids downtown via bike a few years ago when they still rode in the trailer and it was a pain in the rear to find a good place to lock up bike without detaching the trailer.

    kerc | Jul 11, 2012 | New Comment
  3. Seems like bike rental would be a key component for folks coming in to the station via bus (or train?) and looking for an easy way to get somewhere else. For downtown commuters, showers would be an important piece as well.

    jschombe | Jul 11, 2012 | New Comment
  4. A place to park a bike that is safe and out of the elements would be great. Also, bike tools, implements, basic parts, food, etc. for sale would be convenient. A small bike repair shop could supply such items and offer tech support to riders.

    forrestdweller | Jul 11, 2012 | New Comment
  5. Cost is one thing I am concerned about, not so much as the initial construction but the on going cost of up keep.

    Showers would be nice, but having safe clean showers would be hard to keep up especially during rush hours.

    Having a police presence would be great, keep the hub bub and loitering down.

    I feel that the city shouldn’t get into the bike repair business, however this bike center would create a great opportunity for a entrepreneur to open up a shop near by. This goes for the cafe idea as well. If you build it they will come!

    urbuddyandy | Jul 11, 2012 | New Comment
  6. I think the best approach to rental/service would be to put out an RFP to existing shop operators (Twin Ports, Ski Hut, Continental, and Stewart’s) detailing desired services (supply retail, repair, rental of sturdy 3-speed IGH NiceRide-style bikes). The problem would be that if this takes off, it will be a plum bike shop location, but managing the relationship between such a shop and the DTA?/City?/MIC? to make sure that everyone gets what they need could be difficult.

    mlatsch | Jul 11, 2012 | New Comment
  7. In Madison they have elevators that are specific for bike owners and their bikes and burleys so they can go from lake level to street level. For those that don’t want to use the elevator they have ramps that gradually switchback. The hill from Michigan to Superior Street is not that steep but you might want to consider this for older people.

    Also the bike facility should have some easy way/route to connect to the bike paths/routes over in the Canal Park area. There really is no ‘safe’ way downtown to get over the freeway by riding your bike. May be there needs to be an lane added to the skyway plan that allows bike users to ride their bike over to the Canal Park area.

    Ruthie | Jul 12, 2012 | New Comment

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